Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation

John Barry, J. B. Metcalfe, M. A. Farnsworth, W. M. Bennett, C. V. Hodges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transplant teams have been reluctant to accept kidneys preserved with intracellular electrolyte flushing followed by simple cold storage, especially when retrieved by non-transplant surgeons or when preservation time exceeded 24 hours. This study from 1 center is a comparison of 40 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with Collins' C2 flushing followed by simple cold storage to 37 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with cryoprecipitated plasma on the MOX-100 machine. Cold storage time was 10 to 44.5 hours in the C2 group and 3.5 to 39 hours in the machine-perfused group, with a mean of 23 hours in each group. There was no significant difference between the 2 preservation methods no matter who removed the kidney with respect to 1) the incidence of acute tubular necrosis, 2) the 1-month serum creatinine nadir of surviving grafts and 3) the actuarial graft survivals up to 2 years. Among the 40 C2-preserved kidneys 17 were retrieved by community surgeons and 23 were retrieved by transplant surgeons. Human kidneys removed from beating-heart cadaver donors can be preserved satisfactorily with either Collins' 2 flushing followed by simple cold storage or pulsatile machine perfusion, even when preservation times exceed 24 hours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-16
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume123
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1980

Fingerprint

Perfusion
Kidney
Transplants
Cadaver
Pulsatile Flow
Graft Survival
Electrolytes
Creatinine
Necrosis
Tissue Donors
Incidence
Serum
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Barry, J., Metcalfe, J. B., Farnsworth, M. A., Bennett, W. M., & Hodges, C. V. (1980). Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation. Journal of Urology, 123(1), 14-16.

Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation. / Barry, John; Metcalfe, J. B.; Farnsworth, M. A.; Bennett, W. M.; Hodges, C. V.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 123, No. 1, 1980, p. 14-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barry, J, Metcalfe, JB, Farnsworth, MA, Bennett, WM & Hodges, CV 1980, 'Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation', Journal of Urology, vol. 123, no. 1, pp. 14-16.
Barry, John ; Metcalfe, J. B. ; Farnsworth, M. A. ; Bennett, W. M. ; Hodges, C. V. / Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation. In: Journal of Urology. 1980 ; Vol. 123, No. 1. pp. 14-16.
@article{2d31ebb6c19a4c79bef64fd1fe16b06c,
title = "Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation",
abstract = "Transplant teams have been reluctant to accept kidneys preserved with intracellular electrolyte flushing followed by simple cold storage, especially when retrieved by non-transplant surgeons or when preservation time exceeded 24 hours. This study from 1 center is a comparison of 40 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with Collins' C2 flushing followed by simple cold storage to 37 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with cryoprecipitated plasma on the MOX-100 machine. Cold storage time was 10 to 44.5 hours in the C2 group and 3.5 to 39 hours in the machine-perfused group, with a mean of 23 hours in each group. There was no significant difference between the 2 preservation methods no matter who removed the kidney with respect to 1) the incidence of acute tubular necrosis, 2) the 1-month serum creatinine nadir of surviving grafts and 3) the actuarial graft survivals up to 2 years. Among the 40 C2-preserved kidneys 17 were retrieved by community surgeons and 23 were retrieved by transplant surgeons. Human kidneys removed from beating-heart cadaver donors can be preserved satisfactorily with either Collins' 2 flushing followed by simple cold storage or pulsatile machine perfusion, even when preservation times exceed 24 hours.",
author = "John Barry and Metcalfe, {J. B.} and Farnsworth, {M. A.} and Bennett, {W. M.} and Hodges, {C. V.}",
year = "1980",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "123",
pages = "14--16",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of intracellular flushing and cold storage to machine perfusion for human kidney preservation

AU - Barry, John

AU - Metcalfe, J. B.

AU - Farnsworth, M. A.

AU - Bennett, W. M.

AU - Hodges, C. V.

PY - 1980

Y1 - 1980

N2 - Transplant teams have been reluctant to accept kidneys preserved with intracellular electrolyte flushing followed by simple cold storage, especially when retrieved by non-transplant surgeons or when preservation time exceeded 24 hours. This study from 1 center is a comparison of 40 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with Collins' C2 flushing followed by simple cold storage to 37 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with cryoprecipitated plasma on the MOX-100 machine. Cold storage time was 10 to 44.5 hours in the C2 group and 3.5 to 39 hours in the machine-perfused group, with a mean of 23 hours in each group. There was no significant difference between the 2 preservation methods no matter who removed the kidney with respect to 1) the incidence of acute tubular necrosis, 2) the 1-month serum creatinine nadir of surviving grafts and 3) the actuarial graft survivals up to 2 years. Among the 40 C2-preserved kidneys 17 were retrieved by community surgeons and 23 were retrieved by transplant surgeons. Human kidneys removed from beating-heart cadaver donors can be preserved satisfactorily with either Collins' 2 flushing followed by simple cold storage or pulsatile machine perfusion, even when preservation times exceed 24 hours.

AB - Transplant teams have been reluctant to accept kidneys preserved with intracellular electrolyte flushing followed by simple cold storage, especially when retrieved by non-transplant surgeons or when preservation time exceeded 24 hours. This study from 1 center is a comparison of 40 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with Collins' C2 flushing followed by simple cold storage to 37 primary cadaver kidney grafts preserved with cryoprecipitated plasma on the MOX-100 machine. Cold storage time was 10 to 44.5 hours in the C2 group and 3.5 to 39 hours in the machine-perfused group, with a mean of 23 hours in each group. There was no significant difference between the 2 preservation methods no matter who removed the kidney with respect to 1) the incidence of acute tubular necrosis, 2) the 1-month serum creatinine nadir of surviving grafts and 3) the actuarial graft survivals up to 2 years. Among the 40 C2-preserved kidneys 17 were retrieved by community surgeons and 23 were retrieved by transplant surgeons. Human kidneys removed from beating-heart cadaver donors can be preserved satisfactorily with either Collins' 2 flushing followed by simple cold storage or pulsatile machine perfusion, even when preservation times exceed 24 hours.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018867370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018867370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6985977

AN - SCOPUS:0018867370

VL - 123

SP - 14

EP - 16

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 1

ER -