Comparison of hemolysis in blood samples collected using an automatic incision device and a manual lance

Steven (Steve) Kazmierczak, Alex F. Robertson, Kimberly P. Briley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the magnitude of hemolysis in blood specimens collected from the heels of newborns using an automated blood collection device that uses a spring-loaded lance with blood collected using a manual lance. Design: A randomized controlled trial involving 134 newborns assigned to have blood collected using either an automated blood collection device or a manual lance. A single experienced individual performed all blood collections. Serum hemoglobin concentrations were measured in all samples to gauge the extent of hemolysis. Setting: A neonatology unit in a 740-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients: Healthy newborns with gestational ages ranging from 33 weeks to 41 weeks. Blood samples were collected from study participants at between 7 and 126 hours postpartum. Group 1 consisted of 66 individuals who had blood collected using the manual lance. Group 2 contained 68 individuals with blood collected using a spring-loaded automatic lance. Main Outcome Measure: Plasma hemoglobin content as an indicator of the extent of hemolysis. Results: There were no significant differences between newborns in groups 1 and 2 with respect to gestational age, birth weight, or time interval between birth and time of blood collection. We found a highly significant difference with respect to plasma hemoglobin concentrations in specimens collected with an automated lance (hemoglobin, 2.35 g/L) vs that collected using the hand-held lance (hemoglobin, 4.85 g/L). Conclusion: Use of an automated spring-loaded lance allows for the collection of blood specimens with smaller levels of plasma hemoglobin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1072-1074
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume156
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

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Hemolysis
Equipment and Supplies
Hemoglobins
Newborn Infant
Gestational Age
Blood Specimen Collection
Birth Intervals
Neonatology
Heel
Tertiary Healthcare
Birth Weight
Teaching Hospitals
Postpartum Period
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hand
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Comparison of hemolysis in blood samples collected using an automatic incision device and a manual lance. / Kazmierczak, Steven (Steve); Robertson, Alex F.; Briley, Kimberly P.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 156, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 1072-1074.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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