Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests

Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar, John R. Humm, Gregory W. Stadter, William H. Curry, Karen Brasel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study analyzed skeletal and organ injuries in pure lateral and oblique impacts from 20 intact post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests at 6.7 m/s. Injuries to the shoulder, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and spine were scored using AIS 1990-1998 update and 2005. The Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were extracted for both loadings from both versions. Mean age, stature, total body mass and body mass index for pure lateral and oblique tests: 58 and 55 years, 1.7 and 1.8 m, 69 and 66 kg, and 24 and 21 kg/m2. Skeletal injuries (ribs, sternum) occurred in both impacts. However, oblique impacts resulted in more injuries. Pure lateral and oblique impacts ISS: 0 to 16 and 0 to 24, representing a greater potential for injury-related consequences in real-world situations in oblique impacts. Internal organs were more involved in oblique impacts. ISS decreased in AIS 2005, reflecting changes to scoring and drawing attention to potential effects for pre-hospital care/medical aspects. Mean AIS scores for the two load vectors and two AIS coding schemes are included. From automotive crashworthiness perspectives, decreases in injury severities might alter injury risk functions with a shift to lower metrics for the same risk level than current risk estimations. This finding influences dummy-based injury criteria and occupant safety as risk functions are used for countermeasure effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses by regulatory bodies. Increase in organ injuries in oblique loading indicate the importance of this vector as current dummies and injury criteria used in regulations are based on pure lateral impact data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of Advances in Automotive Medicine
Pages197-207
Number of pages11
Volume57
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event57th Annual Scientific Conference of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine - Quebec City, QC, Canada
Duration: Sep 23 2013Sep 25 2013

Other

Other57th Annual Scientific Conference of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City, QC
Period9/23/139/25/13

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Injury Severity Score
Crashworthiness
Bioelectric potentials
Health care
Sternum
Ribs
Pelvis
Costs
Abdomen
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Spine
Body Mass Index
Thorax
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yoganandan, N., Pintar, F. A., Humm, J. R., Stadter, G. W., Curry, W. H., & Brasel, K. (2013). Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests. In Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine (Vol. 57, pp. 197-207)

Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests. / Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Humm, John R.; Stadter, Gregory W.; Curry, William H.; Brasel, Karen.

Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine. Vol. 57 2013. p. 197-207.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yoganandan, N, Pintar, FA, Humm, JR, Stadter, GW, Curry, WH & Brasel, K 2013, Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests. in Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine. vol. 57, pp. 197-207, 57th Annual Scientific Conference of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, Quebec City, QC, Canada, 9/23/13.
Yoganandan N, Pintar FA, Humm JR, Stadter GW, Curry WH, Brasel K. Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests. In Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine. Vol. 57. 2013. p. 197-207
Yoganandan, Narayan ; Pintar, Frank A. ; Humm, John R. ; Stadter, Gregory W. ; Curry, William H. ; Brasel, Karen. / Comparison of AIS 1990 update 98 versus AIS 2005 for describing PMHS injuries in lateral and oblique sled tests. Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine. Vol. 57 2013. pp. 197-207
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