Comparing a computer-based childhood vaccination registry with parental vaccination cards: A population-based study of Delaware children

Alexander N. Ortega, Stephen F. Andrews, Solomon H. Katz, Steven A. Dowshen, W. Scott Curtice, Mary E. Cannon, Denice Stewart, Kyra Kaiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a population-based study in Delaware to examine the reliability of childhood vaccination data in a comprehensive computer-based record system versus parental vaccination cards. We sampled 1,005 children born between January, 1991, and September, 1993. We oversampled for children whose mothers received Medicaid or were uninsured at the time of delivery. Of the survey responders, 276 (56%) had access to written records, and 409 (83%) records were located in the Delaware immunization computer database. The kappa coefficient was 0.18. The observed agreement was 59.8%. When the two databases were combined, the up-to-date rate for 2-year-olds was 58.4%, an increase of 12.7% and 24.2% from the computer database and the parental records, respectively. The computer database was 78.1% sensitive and the parental records were 54.9% sensitive. These results indicate that a comprehensive computer-based record system, with adequate provider participation and proper data management, can be more reliable than parental vaccination cards.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-221
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume36
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Registries
Vaccination
Databases
Population
Medicaid
Immunization
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ortega, A. N., Andrews, S. F., Katz, S. H., Dowshen, S. A., Curtice, W. S., Cannon, M. E., ... Kaiser, K. (1997). Comparing a computer-based childhood vaccination registry with parental vaccination cards: A population-based study of Delaware children. Clinical Pediatrics, 36(4), 217-221.

Comparing a computer-based childhood vaccination registry with parental vaccination cards : A population-based study of Delaware children. / Ortega, Alexander N.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Katz, Solomon H.; Dowshen, Steven A.; Curtice, W. Scott; Cannon, Mary E.; Stewart, Denice; Kaiser, Kyra.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 36, No. 4, 04.1997, p. 217-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortega, AN, Andrews, SF, Katz, SH, Dowshen, SA, Curtice, WS, Cannon, ME, Stewart, D & Kaiser, K 1997, 'Comparing a computer-based childhood vaccination registry with parental vaccination cards: A population-based study of Delaware children', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 217-221.
Ortega, Alexander N. ; Andrews, Stephen F. ; Katz, Solomon H. ; Dowshen, Steven A. ; Curtice, W. Scott ; Cannon, Mary E. ; Stewart, Denice ; Kaiser, Kyra. / Comparing a computer-based childhood vaccination registry with parental vaccination cards : A population-based study of Delaware children. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 1997 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 217-221.
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