Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators: A Systematic Review

Rishi J. Desai, Kylie J. Thaler, Peter Mahlknecht, Gerald Gartlehner, Marian McDonagh, Bita Mesgarpour, Alireza Mazinanian, Anna Glechner, Chandrasekar Gopalakrishnan, Richard A. Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To systematically compare the risk of adverse events (AEs) for 13 targeted immunomodulators (TIMs) indicated for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), inflammatory bowel diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We searched electronic databases through July 2015 to retrieve randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing AEs between 2 or more TIMs head-to-head. We reported on the following outcomes: number of AEs, discontinuation due to AEs, serious AEs, mortality, serious infections, tuberculosis, herpes zoster, and malignancies. We qualitatively synthesized the literature and conducted random-effects meta-analyses if 3 or more studies provided data for an outcome. Results: Ten head-to-head RCTs and 51 observational studies were included in this systematic review. A majority of the studies (70%) were conducted in RA patients. Risk of treatment discontinuation due to AEs was higher with infliximab than with adalimumab or etanercept in RA, PsA, and AS. A higher risk for serious infections was noted with infliximab than with abatacept, adalimumab, or etanercept in RA. Risk for treatment discontinuation due to AEs, serious infections, and tuberculosis was lower with etanercept than with adalimumab in RA. Limited evidence suggested no comparative differences in risk for mortality, malignancies, and herpes zoster for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in RA. Conclusion: Important differences were noted in the safety profile of TIMs in RA, generally favoring abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept over infliximab. Head-to-head comparative evidence for other TIMs and non-RA populations was insufficient to draw conclusions for most of the safety outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1078-1088
Number of pages11
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume68
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Immunologic Factors
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Psoriatic Arthritis
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Herpes Zoster
Observational Studies
Tuberculosis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Infection
Safety
Juvenile Arthritis
Mortality
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Psoriasis
Arthritis
Meta-Analysis
Neoplasms
Etanercept
Adalimumab
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Desai, R. J., Thaler, K. J., Mahlknecht, P., Gartlehner, G., McDonagh, M., Mesgarpour, B., ... Hansen, R. A. (2016). Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators: A Systematic Review. Arthritis Care and Research, 68(8), 1078-1088. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.22815

Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators : A Systematic Review. / Desai, Rishi J.; Thaler, Kylie J.; Mahlknecht, Peter; Gartlehner, Gerald; McDonagh, Marian; Mesgarpour, Bita; Mazinanian, Alireza; Glechner, Anna; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekar; Hansen, Richard A.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 68, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 1078-1088.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Desai, RJ, Thaler, KJ, Mahlknecht, P, Gartlehner, G, McDonagh, M, Mesgarpour, B, Mazinanian, A, Glechner, A, Gopalakrishnan, C & Hansen, RA 2016, 'Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators: A Systematic Review', Arthritis Care and Research, vol. 68, no. 8, pp. 1078-1088. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.22815
Desai, Rishi J. ; Thaler, Kylie J. ; Mahlknecht, Peter ; Gartlehner, Gerald ; McDonagh, Marian ; Mesgarpour, Bita ; Mazinanian, Alireza ; Glechner, Anna ; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekar ; Hansen, Richard A. / Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators : A Systematic Review. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 2016 ; Vol. 68, No. 8. pp. 1078-1088.
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