Comparative effects of an acute dose of fish oil on omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells versus plasma: Implications for clinical utility

William Harris, Stephen A. Varvel, James V. Pottala, G. Russell Warnick, Joseph P. McConnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) biostatus can be estimated with red blood cell (RBC) membranes or plasma. The matrix that exhibits the lower within-person variability and is less affected by an acute dose of n-3 FA is preferred in clinical practice. Objective: We compared the acute effects of a large dose of n-3 FA on RBC and plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Methods: Healthy volunteers (n = 20) were given 4 capsules containing 3.6 g of n-3 FA with a standardized breakfast. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours. The EPA + DHA content of RBC membranes and plasma (the latter expressed as a percentage of total FA and as a concentration) were determined. General linear mixed models were used to analyze the mean response profiles in FA changes over time for plasma and RBCs. Results: At 6 hours after load, the plasma concentration of EPA + DHA had increased by 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24% to 73%) and the plasma EPA + DHA percentage of total FA by 19% (95% CI, 4.7% to 36%). The RBC EPA + DHA percentage of composition was unchanged [-0.6% (95% CI, -2.6% to 1.5%)]. At 24 hours, the change in both of the plasma EPA + DHA markers was 10-fold greater than that in RBCs. Conclusions: An acute dose of n-3 FA (eg, a meal of oily fish or fish oil supplements) taken within a day before a doctor's visit can elevate levels of EPA + DHA in plasma, whether expressed as a percentage or a concentration, but not in RBC membranes. Similar to hemoglobin A1c, which is not affected by an acute glycemic deviation, RBCs provide a more reliable estimate of a patient's chronic EPA + DHA status than does plasma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-440
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Lipidology
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fish Oils
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Erythrocytes
Cell Membrane
Confidence Intervals
lissamine rhodamine B
Breakfast
Capsules
Meals
Linear Models
Healthy Volunteers
Fishes
Hemoglobins

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Biovariability
  • Erythrocytes
  • n-3 Fatty acids
  • Plasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Comparative effects of an acute dose of fish oil on omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells versus plasma : Implications for clinical utility. / Harris, William; Varvel, Stephen A.; Pottala, James V.; Warnick, G. Russell; McConnell, Joseph P.

In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, Vol. 7, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 433-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, William ; Varvel, Stephen A. ; Pottala, James V. ; Warnick, G. Russell ; McConnell, Joseph P. / Comparative effects of an acute dose of fish oil on omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells versus plasma : Implications for clinical utility. In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 433-440.
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T2 - Implications for clinical utility

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AU - Varvel, Stephen A.

AU - Pottala, James V.

AU - Warnick, G. Russell

AU - McConnell, Joseph P.

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N2 - Background: Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) biostatus can be estimated with red blood cell (RBC) membranes or plasma. The matrix that exhibits the lower within-person variability and is less affected by an acute dose of n-3 FA is preferred in clinical practice. Objective: We compared the acute effects of a large dose of n-3 FA on RBC and plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Methods: Healthy volunteers (n = 20) were given 4 capsules containing 3.6 g of n-3 FA with a standardized breakfast. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours. The EPA + DHA content of RBC membranes and plasma (the latter expressed as a percentage of total FA and as a concentration) were determined. General linear mixed models were used to analyze the mean response profiles in FA changes over time for plasma and RBCs. Results: At 6 hours after load, the plasma concentration of EPA + DHA had increased by 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24% to 73%) and the plasma EPA + DHA percentage of total FA by 19% (95% CI, 4.7% to 36%). The RBC EPA + DHA percentage of composition was unchanged [-0.6% (95% CI, -2.6% to 1.5%)]. At 24 hours, the change in both of the plasma EPA + DHA markers was 10-fold greater than that in RBCs. Conclusions: An acute dose of n-3 FA (eg, a meal of oily fish or fish oil supplements) taken within a day before a doctor's visit can elevate levels of EPA + DHA in plasma, whether expressed as a percentage or a concentration, but not in RBC membranes. Similar to hemoglobin A1c, which is not affected by an acute glycemic deviation, RBCs provide a more reliable estimate of a patient's chronic EPA + DHA status than does plasma.

AB - Background: Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) biostatus can be estimated with red blood cell (RBC) membranes or plasma. The matrix that exhibits the lower within-person variability and is less affected by an acute dose of n-3 FA is preferred in clinical practice. Objective: We compared the acute effects of a large dose of n-3 FA on RBC and plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Methods: Healthy volunteers (n = 20) were given 4 capsules containing 3.6 g of n-3 FA with a standardized breakfast. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours. The EPA + DHA content of RBC membranes and plasma (the latter expressed as a percentage of total FA and as a concentration) were determined. General linear mixed models were used to analyze the mean response profiles in FA changes over time for plasma and RBCs. Results: At 6 hours after load, the plasma concentration of EPA + DHA had increased by 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24% to 73%) and the plasma EPA + DHA percentage of total FA by 19% (95% CI, 4.7% to 36%). The RBC EPA + DHA percentage of composition was unchanged [-0.6% (95% CI, -2.6% to 1.5%)]. At 24 hours, the change in both of the plasma EPA + DHA markers was 10-fold greater than that in RBCs. Conclusions: An acute dose of n-3 FA (eg, a meal of oily fish or fish oil supplements) taken within a day before a doctor's visit can elevate levels of EPA + DHA in plasma, whether expressed as a percentage or a concentration, but not in RBC membranes. Similar to hemoglobin A1c, which is not affected by an acute glycemic deviation, RBCs provide a more reliable estimate of a patient's chronic EPA + DHA status than does plasma.

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KW - Erythrocytes

KW - n-3 Fatty acids

KW - Plasma

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