Comparative effectiveness and maintenance of diabetes self-management education interventions for Marshallese patients with type 2 diabetes

A randomized controlled trial

Pearl A. McElfish, Christopher R. Long, Peter Kohler, Karen H.K. Yeary, Zoran Bursac, Marie Rachelle Narcisse, Holly C. Felix, Brett Rowland, Jonell S. Hudson, Peter A. Goulden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Marshallese adults experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. Previous diabetes self-management education (DSME) interventions among Marshallese were unsuccessful. This study compared the extent to which two DSME interventions improved glycemic control, measured on the basis of change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A two-arm randomized controlled trial compared a standard-model DSME (standard DSME) with a culturally adapted family-model DSME (adapted DSME). Marshallese adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 221) received either standard DSME in a community setting (n = 111) or adapted DSME in a home setting (n = 110). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 6 and 12 months after the intervention and were examined with adjusted linear mixed-effects regression models. RESULTS Participants in the adapted DSME arm showed significantly greater declines in mean HbA 1c immediately (20.61% [95% CI 21.19, 20.03]; P = 0.038) and 12 months (20.77% [95% CI 21.38, 20.17]; P = 0.013) after the intervention than those in the standard DSME arm. Within the adapted DSME arm, participants had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (21.18% [95% CI 21.55, 20.81]), to 6 months (20.67% [95% CI 21.06, 20.28]), and to 12 months (20.87% [95% CI 21.28, 20.46]) (P < 0.001 for all). Participants in the standard DSME arm had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (20.55% [95% CI 20.93, 20.17]; P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS Participants receiving the adapted DSME showed significantly greater reductions in mean HbA 1c immediately after and 12 months after the intervention than the reductions among those receiving standard DSME. This study adds to the body of research that shows the potential effectiveness of culturally adapted DSME that includes participants’ family members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)849-858
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetes care
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Self Care
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Randomized Controlled Trials
Maintenance
Education
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Comparative effectiveness and maintenance of diabetes self-management education interventions for Marshallese patients with type 2 diabetes : A randomized controlled trial. / McElfish, Pearl A.; Long, Christopher R.; Kohler, Peter; Yeary, Karen H.K.; Bursac, Zoran; Narcisse, Marie Rachelle; Felix, Holly C.; Rowland, Brett; Hudson, Jonell S.; Goulden, Peter A.

In: Diabetes care, Vol. 42, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 849-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McElfish, Pearl A. ; Long, Christopher R. ; Kohler, Peter ; Yeary, Karen H.K. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Narcisse, Marie Rachelle ; Felix, Holly C. ; Rowland, Brett ; Hudson, Jonell S. ; Goulden, Peter A. / Comparative effectiveness and maintenance of diabetes self-management education interventions for Marshallese patients with type 2 diabetes : A randomized controlled trial. In: Diabetes care. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 849-858.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE Marshallese adults experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. Previous diabetes self-management education (DSME) interventions among Marshallese were unsuccessful. This study compared the extent to which two DSME interventions improved glycemic control, measured on the basis of change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A two-arm randomized controlled trial compared a standard-model DSME (standard DSME) with a culturally adapted family-model DSME (adapted DSME). Marshallese adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 221) received either standard DSME in a community setting (n = 111) or adapted DSME in a home setting (n = 110). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 6 and 12 months after the intervention and were examined with adjusted linear mixed-effects regression models. RESULTS Participants in the adapted DSME arm showed significantly greater declines in mean HbA 1c immediately (20.61{\%} [95{\%} CI 21.19, 20.03]; P = 0.038) and 12 months (20.77{\%} [95{\%} CI 21.38, 20.17]; P = 0.013) after the intervention than those in the standard DSME arm. Within the adapted DSME arm, participants had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (21.18{\%} [95{\%} CI 21.55, 20.81]), to 6 months (20.67{\%} [95{\%} CI 21.06, 20.28]), and to 12 months (20.87{\%} [95{\%} CI 21.28, 20.46]) (P < 0.001 for all). Participants in the standard DSME arm had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (20.55{\%} [95{\%} CI 20.93, 20.17]; P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS Participants receiving the adapted DSME showed significantly greater reductions in mean HbA 1c immediately after and 12 months after the intervention than the reductions among those receiving standard DSME. This study adds to the body of research that shows the potential effectiveness of culturally adapted DSME that includes participants’ family members.",
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AU - McElfish, Pearl A.

AU - Long, Christopher R.

AU - Kohler, Peter

AU - Yeary, Karen H.K.

AU - Bursac, Zoran

AU - Narcisse, Marie Rachelle

AU - Felix, Holly C.

AU - Rowland, Brett

AU - Hudson, Jonell S.

AU - Goulden, Peter A.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE Marshallese adults experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. Previous diabetes self-management education (DSME) interventions among Marshallese were unsuccessful. This study compared the extent to which two DSME interventions improved glycemic control, measured on the basis of change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A two-arm randomized controlled trial compared a standard-model DSME (standard DSME) with a culturally adapted family-model DSME (adapted DSME). Marshallese adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 221) received either standard DSME in a community setting (n = 111) or adapted DSME in a home setting (n = 110). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 6 and 12 months after the intervention and were examined with adjusted linear mixed-effects regression models. RESULTS Participants in the adapted DSME arm showed significantly greater declines in mean HbA 1c immediately (20.61% [95% CI 21.19, 20.03]; P = 0.038) and 12 months (20.77% [95% CI 21.38, 20.17]; P = 0.013) after the intervention than those in the standard DSME arm. Within the adapted DSME arm, participants had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (21.18% [95% CI 21.55, 20.81]), to 6 months (20.67% [95% CI 21.06, 20.28]), and to 12 months (20.87% [95% CI 21.28, 20.46]) (P < 0.001 for all). Participants in the standard DSME arm had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (20.55% [95% CI 20.93, 20.17]; P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS Participants receiving the adapted DSME showed significantly greater reductions in mean HbA 1c immediately after and 12 months after the intervention than the reductions among those receiving standard DSME. This study adds to the body of research that shows the potential effectiveness of culturally adapted DSME that includes participants’ family members.

AB - OBJECTIVE Marshallese adults experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. Previous diabetes self-management education (DSME) interventions among Marshallese were unsuccessful. This study compared the extent to which two DSME interventions improved glycemic control, measured on the basis of change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A two-arm randomized controlled trial compared a standard-model DSME (standard DSME) with a culturally adapted family-model DSME (adapted DSME). Marshallese adults with type 2 diabetes (n = 221) received either standard DSME in a community setting (n = 111) or adapted DSME in a home setting (n = 110). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 6 and 12 months after the intervention and were examined with adjusted linear mixed-effects regression models. RESULTS Participants in the adapted DSME arm showed significantly greater declines in mean HbA 1c immediately (20.61% [95% CI 21.19, 20.03]; P = 0.038) and 12 months (20.77% [95% CI 21.38, 20.17]; P = 0.013) after the intervention than those in the standard DSME arm. Within the adapted DSME arm, participants had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (21.18% [95% CI 21.55, 20.81]), to 6 months (20.67% [95% CI 21.06, 20.28]), and to 12 months (20.87% [95% CI 21.28, 20.46]) (P < 0.001 for all). Participants in the standard DSME arm had significant reductions in mean HbA 1c from baseline to immediately after the intervention (20.55% [95% CI 20.93, 20.17]; P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS Participants receiving the adapted DSME showed significantly greater reductions in mean HbA 1c immediately after and 12 months after the intervention than the reductions among those receiving standard DSME. This study adds to the body of research that shows the potential effectiveness of culturally adapted DSME that includes participants’ family members.

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