Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in vitro or in situ.

Amy Kronenberg, Stacey Gauny, Ely Kwoh, Lanelle Connolly, Cristian Dan, Michael Lasarev, Mitchell Turker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Astronauts receive exposures to high-energy heavy ions from galactic cosmic radiation. Although high-energy heavy ions are mutagenic and carcinogenic, their mutagenic potency in epithelial cells, where most human cancers develop, is poorly understood. Mutations are a critical component of human cancer, and mutations involving autosomal loci predominate. This study addresses the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in mouse kidney epithelium. Mutant fractions were measured for an endogenous autosomal locus (Aprt) that detects all types of mutagenic events contributing to human cancer. Results for kidneys irradiated in situ are compared with results for kidney cells from the same strain exposed in vitro. The results demonstrate dose-dependent cell killing in vitro and for cells explanted 3-4 months postirradiation in situ, but in situ exposures were less likely to result in cell death than in vitro exposures. Prolonged incubation in situ (8-9 months) further attenuated cell killing at lower doses. Iron ions were mutagenic to cells in vitro and for irradiated kidneys. No sparing was seen for mutant frequency with a long incubation period in situ. In addition, the degree of mutation induction (relative increase over background) was similar for cells exposed in vitro or in situ. We speculate that the latent effects of iron-ion exposure contribute to the maintenance of an elevated mutation burden in an epithelial tissue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-557
Number of pages8
JournalRadiation Research
Volume172
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

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epithelium
kidneys
mutations
mice
Epithelium
Iron
Ions
Kidney
iron
Mutation
cancer
loci
cells
Heavy Ions
heavy ions
ions
dosage
astronauts
Cosmic Radiation
death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biophysics
  • Radiation

Cite this

Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in vitro or in situ. / Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Connolly, Lanelle; Dan, Cristian; Lasarev, Michael; Turker, Mitchell.

In: Radiation Research, Vol. 172, No. 5, 11.2009, p. 550-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kronenberg, Amy ; Gauny, Stacey ; Kwoh, Ely ; Connolly, Lanelle ; Dan, Cristian ; Lasarev, Michael ; Turker, Mitchell. / Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in vitro or in situ. In: Radiation Research. 2009 ; Vol. 172, No. 5. pp. 550-557.
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