Community-based rapid HIV testing in homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco

J. B. Buchér, K. M. Thomas, D. Guzman, E. Riley, N. Dela Cruz, David Bangsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Standard two-step HIV testing is limited by poor return-for-results rates and misses high-risk individuals who do not access conventional testing facilities. Methods: We describe a community-based rapid HIV testing programme in which homeless and marginally housed adults recruited from shelters, free meal programmes and single room occupancy hotels in San Francisco received OraQuick Rapid HIV-1 Antibody testing (OraSure Technologies, Bethlehem, PA, USA). Results: Over 8 months, 1614 adults were invited to participate and 1213 (75.2%) underwent testing. HIV seroprevalence was 15.4% (187 of 1213 individuals) overall and 3.5% (37 of 1063) amongst high-risk individuals reporting no previous testing, a prior negative test, or previous testing without result disclosure. All 1213 participants received their results. Of 30 newly diagnosed persons who received confirmatory results, 26 (86.7%) reported at least one contact with a primary healthcare provider in the 6 months following diagnosis. Conclusions: We conclude that community-based rapid testing is feasible, acceptable and effective based on the numbers of high-risk persons tested over a short period, the participation rate, the prevalence of new infection, the rate of result disclosure, and the proportion linked to care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-31
Number of pages4
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

San Francisco
Disclosure
HIV
HIV Seroprevalence
HIV Antibodies
Health Personnel
Meals
HIV-1
Primary Health Care
Technology
Infection

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Homelessness
  • Substance abuse
  • Urban health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Community-based rapid HIV testing in homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. / Buchér, J. B.; Thomas, K. M.; Guzman, D.; Riley, E.; Dela Cruz, N.; Bangsberg, David.

In: HIV Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 28-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buchér, J. B. ; Thomas, K. M. ; Guzman, D. ; Riley, E. ; Dela Cruz, N. ; Bangsberg, David. / Community-based rapid HIV testing in homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. In: HIV Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 28-31.
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