Combustion as the principal source of carbonaceous aerosol in the Ohio River Valley

James Huntzicker, E. K. Heyerdahl, S. R. McDow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organic and elemental carbon and a number of carboxylic acids and n-alkanes were measured in aerosol samples collected at three sites in the Ohio River Valley between October 1980 and August 1981. Approximately 100 filters were analyzed for organic and elemental carbon for each site. For the 11-month period organic and elemental carbon comprised about 19% of the total aerosol mass with about two-thirds of the carbon as organic. Regression analysis showed that the principal source of organic carbon was combustion. The measurements of the specific organic compounds indicated a weak biogenic component to the organic aerosol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-709
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Air Pollution Control Association
Volume36
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1986

Fingerprint

Aerosols
Rivers
Carbon
combustion
aerosol
valley
carbon
river
carboxylic acid
Organic carbon
Carboxylic acids
Organic compounds
Alkanes
Regression analysis
alkane
Paraffins
organic compound
regression analysis
Carboxylic Acids
organic carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Combustion as the principal source of carbonaceous aerosol in the Ohio River Valley. / Huntzicker, James; Heyerdahl, E. K.; McDow, S. R.

In: Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, Vol. 36, No. 6, 06.1986, p. 705-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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