Colorectal cancer in Hispanics: A population at risk for earlier onset, advanced disease, and decreased survival

Dimitrios Stefanidis, Brad H. Pollock, Jennifer Miranda, Adrian Wong, Francis E. Sharkey, Dennis L. Rousseau, Charles Thomas, Morton S. Kahlenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: While colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates have declined slightly over the past decade, there remain marked differences by ethnicity. Our aim was to investigate ethnic differences in occurrence, clinical presentation and outcome of CRC at a tertiary university center that serves a predominantly Hispanic population. METHODS: Prospectively collected data from the tumor registry on patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 1985 through 2001 was examined. Age at diagnosis, mode of presentation, sex, tumor location, ethnicity, TNM stage, and survivals were assessed and ethnic differences were sought. RESULTS: Records from 453 patients with CRC were reviewed. There were 296 (65%) patients that were Hispanics, 112 (25%) non-Hispanic Whites, 37 (8%) African Americans, and 8 (2%) of other or unknown ethnicity. Compared with non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics presented at a younger age (58.5 ± 14 versus 53.6 ± 12.73, respectively; P <0.01), with a significantly greater incidence of stage IV disease (19% versus 32%, respectively; P = 0.02). They had significantly poorer age-adjusted survival (median survival of 92 months for 55 years versus 48 months for 55 years, respectively; adjusted log rank P = 0.045). There were no differences in tumor location, mode of presentation or adjuvant treatment received. CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic patients with CRC in our catchment area present at a younger age with more metastatic disease and have a poorer survival than non-Hispanic Whites. Modification of screening criteria and treatment paradigms may be required for Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-126
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Hispanic Americans
Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival
Neoplasms
Incidence
African Americans
Registries
Mortality
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Ethnic differences
  • Hispanics
  • Outcome
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Colorectal cancer in Hispanics : A population at risk for earlier onset, advanced disease, and decreased survival. / Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Pollock, Brad H.; Miranda, Jennifer; Wong, Adrian; Sharkey, Francis E.; Rousseau, Dennis L.; Thomas, Charles; Kahlenberg, Morton S.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 29, No. 2, 04.2006, p. 123-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stefanidis, Dimitrios ; Pollock, Brad H. ; Miranda, Jennifer ; Wong, Adrian ; Sharkey, Francis E. ; Rousseau, Dennis L. ; Thomas, Charles ; Kahlenberg, Morton S. / Colorectal cancer in Hispanics : A population at risk for earlier onset, advanced disease, and decreased survival. In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials. 2006 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 123-126.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: While colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates have declined slightly over the past decade, there remain marked differences by ethnicity. Our aim was to investigate ethnic differences in occurrence, clinical presentation and outcome of CRC at a tertiary university center that serves a predominantly Hispanic population. METHODS: Prospectively collected data from the tumor registry on patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 1985 through 2001 was examined. Age at diagnosis, mode of presentation, sex, tumor location, ethnicity, TNM stage, and survivals were assessed and ethnic differences were sought. RESULTS: Records from 453 patients with CRC were reviewed. There were 296 (65{\%}) patients that were Hispanics, 112 (25{\%}) non-Hispanic Whites, 37 (8{\%}) African Americans, and 8 (2{\%}) of other or unknown ethnicity. Compared with non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics presented at a younger age (58.5 ± 14 versus 53.6 ± 12.73, respectively; P <0.01), with a significantly greater incidence of stage IV disease (19{\%} versus 32{\%}, respectively; P = 0.02). They had significantly poorer age-adjusted survival (median survival of 92 months for 55 years versus 48 months for 55 years, respectively; adjusted log rank P = 0.045). There were no differences in tumor location, mode of presentation or adjuvant treatment received. CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic patients with CRC in our catchment area present at a younger age with more metastatic disease and have a poorer survival than non-Hispanic Whites. Modification of screening criteria and treatment paradigms may be required for Hispanics.",
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AB - BACKGROUND: While colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates have declined slightly over the past decade, there remain marked differences by ethnicity. Our aim was to investigate ethnic differences in occurrence, clinical presentation and outcome of CRC at a tertiary university center that serves a predominantly Hispanic population. METHODS: Prospectively collected data from the tumor registry on patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 1985 through 2001 was examined. Age at diagnosis, mode of presentation, sex, tumor location, ethnicity, TNM stage, and survivals were assessed and ethnic differences were sought. RESULTS: Records from 453 patients with CRC were reviewed. There were 296 (65%) patients that were Hispanics, 112 (25%) non-Hispanic Whites, 37 (8%) African Americans, and 8 (2%) of other or unknown ethnicity. Compared with non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics presented at a younger age (58.5 ± 14 versus 53.6 ± 12.73, respectively; P <0.01), with a significantly greater incidence of stage IV disease (19% versus 32%, respectively; P = 0.02). They had significantly poorer age-adjusted survival (median survival of 92 months for 55 years versus 48 months for 55 years, respectively; adjusted log rank P = 0.045). There were no differences in tumor location, mode of presentation or adjuvant treatment received. CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic patients with CRC in our catchment area present at a younger age with more metastatic disease and have a poorer survival than non-Hispanic Whites. Modification of screening criteria and treatment paradigms may be required for Hispanics.

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