Colon and rectal injuries during operation Iraqi freedom: Are there any changing trends in management or outcome?

Scott R. Steele, Kate E. Wolcott, Philip S. Mullenix, Matthew J. Martin, James A. Sebesta, Kenneth Azarow, Alec C. Beekley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Despite the evolution in the management of traumatic colorectal injuries in both civilian and military settings during the previous few decades, they continue to be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to analyze management and clinical outcomes from a cohort of patients suffering colorectal injuries. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from all patients injured and treated at the 31st Combat Support Hospital during Operation Iraqi Freedom from September 2003 to December 2004. RESULTS: From the 3,442 patients treated, 175 (5.1 percent) had colorectal injuries. Patients were predominately male (95 percent), suffered penetrating injuries (96 percent), and had a mean age of 29 (range, 4-70) years. Ninety-one percent of patients had associated injuries. Initial management included primary repair (34 percent), stoma (33 percent), resection with anastomosis (19 percent), and damage control only (14 percent). By injury location, stomas were placed more frequently with rectal or sphincter injuries 65 percent (25/40) vs. other sites (right, 19 percent (8/42); transverse, 25 percent (8/32); left, 36 percent (20/55); P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)870-877
Number of pages8
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

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2003-2011 Iraq War
Colon
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Colon and rectal trauma
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Penetrating injuries
  • Stoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Colon and rectal injuries during operation Iraqi freedom : Are there any changing trends in management or outcome? / Steele, Scott R.; Wolcott, Kate E.; Mullenix, Philip S.; Martin, Matthew J.; Sebesta, James A.; Azarow, Kenneth; Beekley, Alec C.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 50, No. 6, 06.2007, p. 870-877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steele, Scott R. ; Wolcott, Kate E. ; Mullenix, Philip S. ; Martin, Matthew J. ; Sebesta, James A. ; Azarow, Kenneth ; Beekley, Alec C. / Colon and rectal injuries during operation Iraqi freedom : Are there any changing trends in management or outcome?. In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 2007 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 870-877.
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