Cognitive-behavioral treatments for tinnitus: A review of the literature

Rilana F F Cima, Gerhard Andersson, Caroline J. Schmidt, James Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Tinnitus can be defined as the perception of an auditory sensation, perceivable without the presence of an external sound. Purpose: The aim of this article is to systematically review the peer-reviewed literature on treatment approaches for tinnitus based on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and to provide a historical overview of developments within these approaches. Research Design: Experimental studies, (randomized) trials, follow-up assessments, and reviews assessing educational, counseling, psychological, and CBT treatment approaches were identified as a result of an electronic database metasearch. Results: A total of 31 (of the initial 75 studies) were included in the review. Results confirm that CBT treatment for tinnitus management is the most evidence-based treatment option so far. Though studied protocols are diverse and are usually a combination of different treatment elements, and tinnitus diagnostics and outcome assessments vary over investigations, a common ground of therapeutic elements was established, and evidence was found to be robust enough to guide clinical practice. Conclusions: Treatment strategy might best be CBT-based, moving toward a more multidisciplinary approach. There is room for the involvement of different disciplines, using a stepped-care approach. This may provide brief and effective treatment for a larger group of tinnitus patients, and additional treatment steps can be provided for those suffering on a more severe level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-61
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Tinnitus
Cognitive Therapy
Therapeutics
Auditory Perception
Peer Review
Counseling
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Psychology

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral
  • Multidisciplinary
  • Review
  • Sound therapy
  • Tinnitus
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Cognitive-behavioral treatments for tinnitus : A review of the literature. / Cima, Rilana F F; Andersson, Gerhard; Schmidt, Caroline J.; Henry, James.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 2014, p. 29-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cima, Rilana F F ; Andersson, Gerhard ; Schmidt, Caroline J. ; Henry, James. / Cognitive-behavioral treatments for tinnitus : A review of the literature. In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 29-61.
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