Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus: Addressing the Controversy of Its Clinical Delivery by Audiologists

James A. Henry, Marie Christine Goodworth, Elizabeth Lima, Tara Zaugg, Emily J. Thielman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Audiologists' role in providing care for tinnitus typically includes conducting an audiologic evaluation, fitting hearing aids when appropriate, assessing the impact of tinnitus, and facilitating use of sound to improve quality of life with tinnitus when appropriate. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is consistently judged by systematic reviews as having the strongest evidence relative to other therapies for improving quality of life with tinnitus. Because audiologists are already playing an active role in providing care for tinnitus, and the relative paucity of behavioral health providers who are experienced in implementing CBT for tinnitus, a logical question is whether audiologists can provide CBT and whether it is within their scope of practice. In this article, we present both sides of the argument as to whether audiologists can provide CBT and we make recommendations for appropriate administration of CBT for tinnitus management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-289
Number of pages7
JournalEar and hearing
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Audiologists
  • Behavioral therapy
  • Cognitive
  • Counseling
  • Psychologists
  • Tinnitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

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