Cognition and fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Potential effects of medications with central nervous system activity

Barry S. Oken, Kristin Flegal, Daniel Zajdel, Shirley S. Kishiyama, Jesus Lovera, Bridget Bagert, Dennis N. Bourdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

To evaluate the potential effects of medications with central nervous system (CNS) activity on cognitive function and fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS), we performed a retrospective analysis of medication use among 70 subjects with MS who were participating in a clinical trial for evaluation of the effects of yoga and exercise programs on cognition and fatigue. Among these MS subjects, 74% were taking at least one potentially CNS-active medication. These 70 subjects were divided into two groups: those taking at least one CNS-active medication (n = 52) and those not on any medications with potential CNS activity (n = 18). We compared assessments of cognitive function and fatigue using an analysis of covariance. MS subjects on CNS-active medication had greater impairment on measures of processing speed, sustained attention, and fatigue than those not on these medications. While these findings do not establish a causal relationship between medication use and cognitive impairment and fatigue, the data indicate that researchers need to control for use of CNS-active medications when conducting studies of cognitive impairment and fatigue in MS subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-90
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Alertness
  • Attention
  • Attentional shifting
  • Central nervous system agents
  • Cognition
  • Divided attention
  • Fatigue
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Processing speed
  • Reaction time
  • Sustained attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognition and fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Potential effects of medications with central nervous system activity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this