Cognition and fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Potential effects of medications with central nervous system activity

Barry S. Oken, Kristin Flegal, Daniel Zajdel, Shirley S. Kishiyama, Jesus Lovera, Bridget Bagert, Dennis N. Bourdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

To evaluate the potential effects of medications with central nervous system (CNS) activity on cognitive function and fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS), we performed a retrospective analysis of medication use among 70 subjects with MS who were participating in a clinical trial for evaluation of the effects of yoga and exercise programs on cognition and fatigue. Among these MS subjects, 74% were taking at least one potentially CNS-active medication. These 70 subjects were divided into two groups: those taking at least one CNS-active medication (n = 52) and those not on any medications with potential CNS activity (n = 18). We compared assessments of cognitive function and fatigue using an analysis of covariance. MS subjects on CNS-active medication had greater impairment on measures of processing speed, sustained attention, and fatigue than those not on these medications. While these findings do not establish a causal relationship between medication use and cognitive impairment and fatigue, the data indicate that researchers need to control for use of CNS-active medications when conducting studies of cognitive impairment and fatigue in MS subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-90
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Alertness
  • Attention
  • Attentional shifting
  • Central nervous system agents
  • Cognition
  • Divided attention
  • Fatigue
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Processing speed
  • Reaction time
  • Sustained attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognition and fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Potential effects of medications with central nervous system activity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this