Coadministration of haloperidol and SCH-23390 prevents the increase in "perforated" synapses due to either drug alone

Charles K. Meshul, Aaron Janowsky, Daniel Casey, Regina K. Stallbaumer, Barry Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perforated synapses, which have a discontinuous density along the postsynaptic membrane, undergo changes in numbers under various experimental conditions. We have previously shown that 14-day administration of haloperidol, a typical neuroleptic which induces extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) and tardive dyskinesia (TD) in patients, causes an increase in the percentage of perforated synapses within the caudate nucleus. This increase was reversed if the animals were taken off the drug for an equal period of time (14 days). There was no effect within the nucleus accumbens. The atypical antipsychotic drug, clozapine, which when administered precipitates a very much lower incidence of EPS and TD, had no effect on the percentage of perforated synapses within either the caudate or nucleus accumbens. Because clozapine binds to both dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors, it was of interest to determine if any changes in perforated synapses occurred following administration of the specific D1 antagonist, SCH-23390. Furthermore, because the action of D2 agonists may be dependent on the activation of the D1 receptor, we asked whether concomitant blockade of the D1 receptor could prevent the increase in perforated synapses due to the action of haloperidol, a drug which upregulates D2 receptors. We found that 14-day treatment with SCH-23390 (1.0 mg/kg per day) or haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg per day) caused an increase in the percentage of perforated synapses within the caudate but not the nucleus accumbens. There was a corresponding increase in DA D1 and D2 receptors in the caudate following administration of SCH-23390 or haloperidol, respectively. Coadministration of the two drugs prevented the increase in perforated synapses within the caudate, even though D1 and D2 receptors were significantly increased. Our data suggest that the regulation of perforated synapses and DA receptors are independent events. This could be explained anatomically if the two DA receptor subtypes are located on different striatal neurons whose efferent projections are initially distinct but converge in a common brain area. Administration of SCH-23390 might, therefore, attenuate the EPS and TD associated with haloperidol treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-293
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Haloperidol
Synapses
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Caudate Nucleus
Nucleus Accumbens
Dopamine D1 Receptors
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Clozapine
Dopamine Receptors
Antipsychotic Agents
Efferent Neurons
Post-Synaptic Density
Corpus Striatum
SCH 23390
Up-Regulation
Membranes
Incidence
Brain
Tardive Dyskinesia

Keywords

  • Electron microscopy
  • Extrapyramidal syndrome
  • Haloperidol
  • Perforated synapses
  • SCH-23390
  • Tardive dyskinesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Coadministration of haloperidol and SCH-23390 prevents the increase in "perforated" synapses due to either drug alone. / Meshul, Charles K.; Janowsky, Aaron; Casey, Daniel; Stallbaumer, Regina K.; Taylor, Barry.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1992, p. 285-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meshul, Charles K. ; Janowsky, Aaron ; Casey, Daniel ; Stallbaumer, Regina K. ; Taylor, Barry. / Coadministration of haloperidol and SCH-23390 prevents the increase in "perforated" synapses due to either drug alone. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 1992 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 285-293.
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