CNS side effects of immune checkpoint inhibitors: Preclinical models, genetics and multimodality therapy

Gwendolyn J. McGinnis, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following cancer treatment, patients often report behavioral and cognitive changes. Novel cancer immunotherapeutics have the potential to produce sustained cancer survivorship, meaning patients will live longer with the side effects of treatment. Given the role of inflammatory pathways in mediating behavioral and cognitive impairments seen in cancer, we aim in this review to discuss emerging evidence for the contribution of immune checkpoint blockade to exacerbate these CNS effects. We discuss ongoing studies regarding the ability of immune checkpoint inhibitors to reach the brain and how treatment responses to checkpoint inhibitors may be modulated by genetic factors. We further consider the use of preclinical tumor-models to study the role of tumor status in CNS effects of immune checkpoint inhibitors and multimodality therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-942
Number of pages14
JournalImmunotherapy
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Genetic Therapy
Neoplasms
Aptitude
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Brain

Keywords

  • checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy
  • neuroinflammation
  • radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology

Cite this

CNS side effects of immune checkpoint inhibitors : Preclinical models, genetics and multimodality therapy. / McGinnis, Gwendolyn J.; Raber, Jacob.

In: Immunotherapy, Vol. 9, No. 11, 01.09.2017, p. 929-942.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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