Clostridium difficile colitis: An increasing hospital-acquired illness

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Colitis caused by Clostridium difficile is receiving increased attention as a nosocomial hospital-acquired infection. METHODS: To determine the incidence of C difficile colitis in our facility and the relative proportion of patients dying from the colitis or requiring colectomy for it, we retrospectively reviewed 201 cases of colitis caused by C difficile from 1984 to 1994. RESULTS: The incidence of C difficile colitis appears to be sharply increasing and is associated with the use of cephalosporins. Among patients who subsequently developed C difficile colitis, the most frequent indication for antibiotic use was perioperative prophylaxis; surgical patients comprised 55% of the total cases. Surgical intervention was required for 5% of patients with C difficile colitis, with an operative mortality of 30%. The overall mortality was 3.5% and was associated with a delay in diagnosis. The only discriminative factor between patients who died and those who survived was length of time from symptoms to treatment - 5.43 days for survivors versus 10.7 days for those who died (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-483
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume169
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Clostridium difficile
Colitis
Cross Infection
Mortality
Colectomy
Incidence
Cephalosporins
Survivors
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Clostridium difficile colitis : An increasing hospital-acquired illness. / Jobe, B. A.; Grasley, A.; Deveney, Karen; Deveney, Clifford; Sheppard, Brett.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 169, No. 5, 1995, p. 480-483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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