Closed-loop adaptive filtering for supressing chest compression oscillations in the capnogram during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Mikel Leturiondo, J. J. Gutierrez, Sofía Ruiz De Gauna, Sandra Plaza, José F. Veintemillas, Mohamud Ramzan Daya

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Capnography is widely used by the advanced-life-support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Continuous analysis of the capnogram allows guidance of adequate ventilation rate, currently 10 breaths/min for intubated patients. We used 60 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest episodes containing both clean and CC corrupted capnograms. Chest compressions (CC) induce high-frequency oscillations in the capnography waveform impeding reliable detection of ventilations. Thus, a clean capnogram is essential for a better ventilation detection performance. To clean the capnogram, an adaptive noise cancellation notch filter was designed using a Least Mean Square algorithm to minimize filtering error. A fixed-coefficient low-pass filter was optimized for comparison. For the whole test set, global Se/PPV improved from 93.0/92.2% to 97.6/96.2% after adaptive filtering and to 97.7/94.8% after fixed-coefficient filtering. For the clean subset, Se/PPV maintained stable and for the corrupted subset, Se/PPV improved from 84.8/84.0% to 95.2/92.7% and 95.4/90.3%, respectively. Filtering allowed reliable automated detection of ventilations in the capnogram even in the presence of CC oscillations during CPR. Nevertheless, further evaluation of these techniques in large datasets is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalComputing in Cardiology
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event44th Computing in Cardiology Conference, CinC 2017 - Rennes, France
Duration: Sep 24 2017Sep 27 2017

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Resuscitation
Adaptive filtering
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Ventilation
Thorax
Capnography
Chest Wall Oscillation
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Notch filters
Low pass filters
Least-Squares Analysis
Noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Closed-loop adaptive filtering for supressing chest compression oscillations in the capnogram during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. / Leturiondo, Mikel; Gutierrez, J. J.; De Gauna, Sofía Ruiz; Plaza, Sandra; Veintemillas, José F.; Daya, Mohamud Ramzan.

In: Computing in Cardiology, Vol. 44, 01.01.2017, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Leturiondo, Mikel ; Gutierrez, J. J. ; De Gauna, Sofía Ruiz ; Plaza, Sandra ; Veintemillas, José F. ; Daya, Mohamud Ramzan. / Closed-loop adaptive filtering for supressing chest compression oscillations in the capnogram during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In: Computing in Cardiology. 2017 ; Vol. 44. pp. 1-4.
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