Clinical Outcomes in Children With Orbital Cellulitis and Radiographic Globe Tenting

Rebecca A. Lindsay, Avery H. Weiss, John P. Kelly, Valerie Anderson, Theodore H. Lindsay, Michelle T. Cabrera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

METHODS: The records of 46 consecutive children with orbital cellulitis at a single tertiary children's hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Initial and final visual acuities were available for 34 of 46 patients (74%). Globe tenting was defined by an angle of 130° or less at the optic nerve-globe junction as derived from sagittal CT or MRI. Visual acuities of 4 children with globe tenting (mean age, 10.3 ± 3.3 years) were compared with those of 30 children without globe tenting (mean age, 10.8 ± 3.5 years). Final logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuities were analyzed.

RESULTS: The mean posterior globe angle was 124.5° ± 8.0° in patients with globe tenting, compared with 145.6° ± 7.4° in the affected eye of the patients without globe tenting (p = 0.002). Final visual acuity was logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution = 0 following treatment in patients with globe tenting and logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution = 0.02 in patients without tenting (p = 0.70).

DISCUSSION: We propose that the increased elastic compliance of the optic nerve sheath and sclera in children may contribute to better visual outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric orbital cellulitis with globe tenting may not lead to devastating vision loss as previously seen in adults.

PURPOSE: Axial displacement of the globe with tenting centered on the optic nerve-globe junction is a predictor of visual loss in adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the visual outcomes of children with orbital cellulitis and globe tenting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-332
Number of pages4
JournalOphthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Orbital Cellulitis
Visual Acuity
Optic Nerve
Sclera
Tertiary Care Centers
Compliance
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Lindsay, R. A., Weiss, A. H., Kelly, J. P., Anderson, V., Lindsay, T. H., & Cabrera, M. T. (2018). Clinical Outcomes in Children With Orbital Cellulitis and Radiographic Globe Tenting. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 34(4), 329-332. https://doi.org/10.1097/IOP.0000000000000976

Clinical Outcomes in Children With Orbital Cellulitis and Radiographic Globe Tenting. / Lindsay, Rebecca A.; Weiss, Avery H.; Kelly, John P.; Anderson, Valerie; Lindsay, Theodore H.; Cabrera, Michelle T.

In: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 329-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindsay, Rebecca A. ; Weiss, Avery H. ; Kelly, John P. ; Anderson, Valerie ; Lindsay, Theodore H. ; Cabrera, Michelle T. / Clinical Outcomes in Children With Orbital Cellulitis and Radiographic Globe Tenting. In: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2018 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 329-332.
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