Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism

C. S. Lee, M. Schulzer, E. K. Mak, B. J. Snow, J. K. Tsui, S. Calne, John Hammerstad, D. B. Calne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The time course of evolution of clinical deficits has been a traditional guide to the nature of the aetiopathogenesis of neurological disease. We studied the influence of ageing and duration of disease on the natural history of idiopathic parkinsonism (IP). Two hundred and thirty-eight patients with IP were examined while off medication. Bradykinesia scores were analysed against patients' age and duration of disease by multiple regression. There was no significant interaction between the effects of age and of duration (P = 0.923). We conclude that age and duration of symptoms influence the natural history of IP additively and independently. Furthermore, the rate of neuronal death is more rapid in the earlier stages of evolution of the pathology; subsequently, the velocity of progression slows down to approach the rate of attrition produced by normal ageing. This time course has implications for possible models of pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalBrain
Volume117
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1994

Fingerprint

Parkinsonian Disorders
Progression
duration
Aging of materials
natural history
Hypokinesia
Pathology
Natural History
Attrition
Multiple Regression
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
drug therapy
pathogenesis
Mortality
death
Observation
Interaction
History
Influence
Model

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Natural history
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Pathogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Lee, C. S., Schulzer, M., Mak, E. K., Snow, B. J., Tsui, J. K., Calne, S., ... Calne, D. B. (1994). Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism. Brain, 117(3), 501-507.

Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism. / Lee, C. S.; Schulzer, M.; Mak, E. K.; Snow, B. J.; Tsui, J. K.; Calne, S.; Hammerstad, John; Calne, D. B.

In: Brain, Vol. 117, No. 3, 06.1994, p. 501-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, CS, Schulzer, M, Mak, EK, Snow, BJ, Tsui, JK, Calne, S, Hammerstad, J & Calne, DB 1994, 'Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism', Brain, vol. 117, no. 3, pp. 501-507.
Lee CS, Schulzer M, Mak EK, Snow BJ, Tsui JK, Calne S et al. Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism. Brain. 1994 Jun;117(3):501-507.
Lee, C. S. ; Schulzer, M. ; Mak, E. K. ; Snow, B. J. ; Tsui, J. K. ; Calne, S. ; Hammerstad, John ; Calne, D. B. / Clinical observations on the rate of progression of idiopathic parkinsonism. In: Brain. 1994 ; Vol. 117, No. 3. pp. 501-507.
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