Clinical informatics fellowship programs: In search of a viable financial model: An open letter to the centers for medicare and medicaid services

Christoph U. Lehmann, C. A. Longhurst, William (Bill) Hersh, Vishnu Mohan, B. P. Levy, P. J. Embi, J. T. Finnell, A. M. Turner, R. Martin, J. Williamson, B. Munger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-270
Number of pages4
JournalApplied Clinical Informatics
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
Medical Informatics
Health
Information technology
Data visualization
Health care
Medicine
Costs
Clinical Decision Support Systems
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Medicaid
Medicare
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Safety

Keywords

  • Centers for medicare and medicaid services
  • Clinical informatics
  • Education
  • Graduate medical education
  • Health information technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Clinical informatics fellowship programs : In search of a viable financial model: An open letter to the centers for medicare and medicaid services. / Lehmann, Christoph U.; Longhurst, C. A.; Hersh, William (Bill); Mohan, Vishnu; Levy, B. P.; Embi, P. J.; Finnell, J. T.; Turner, A. M.; Martin, R.; Williamson, J.; Munger, B.

In: Applied Clinical Informatics, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2015, p. 267-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lehmann, Christoph U. ; Longhurst, C. A. ; Hersh, William (Bill) ; Mohan, Vishnu ; Levy, B. P. ; Embi, P. J. ; Finnell, J. T. ; Turner, A. M. ; Martin, R. ; Williamson, J. ; Munger, B. / Clinical informatics fellowship programs : In search of a viable financial model: An open letter to the centers for medicare and medicaid services. In: Applied Clinical Informatics. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 267-270.
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