Clinical guide for audiologic tinnitus management II: Treatment

James Henry, Tara L. Zaugg, Martin A. Schechter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This article is the second of 2 that address the need for basic procedures that can be used commonly by audiologists to manage patients with clinically significant tinnitus, as well as hyperacusis. The method described is termed audiologic tinnitus management (ATM). Method: ATM was developed specifically for use by audiologists. Although certain procedural components were adapted from the methods of tinnitus masking and tinnitus retraining therapy, ATM is uniquely and specifically defined. A detailed description of the ATM assessment procedures is provided in the companion article (J. A. Henry, T. L. Zaugg, & M. A. Schlechter, 2005). The present article describes a specific clinical protocol for providing treatment with ATM. Results: The treatment method described for ATM includes structured informational counseling and an individualized program of sound enhancement that can include the use of hearing aids, ear-level noise generators, combination instruments (noise generator and hearing aid combined), personal listening devices (wearable CD, tape, and MP3 players), and augmentative sound devices (e.g., tabletop sound generators). Ongoing treatment appointments involve primarily the structured counseling, evaluation, and adjustment of the use of sound devices, and assessment of treatment outcomes. The informational counseling protocol and an interview form for determining treatment outcomes are each described in step-by-step detail for direct clinical application. Conclusion: This article can serve as a practical clinical guide for audiologists to provide treatment for tinnitus in a uniform manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-70
Number of pages22
JournalAmerican Journal of Audiology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Tinnitus
Therapeutics
Counseling
Hearing Aids
Equipment and Supplies
MP3-Player
Noise
Hyperacusis
Social Adjustment
Clinical Protocols
Ear
Appointments and Schedules
Interviews

Keywords

  • Hearing functions and disorders
  • Intervention
  • Outcomes
  • Tinnitus
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Clinical guide for audiologic tinnitus management II : Treatment. / Henry, James; Zaugg, Tara L.; Schechter, Martin A.

In: American Journal of Audiology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2005, p. 49-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henry, James ; Zaugg, Tara L. ; Schechter, Martin A. / Clinical guide for audiologic tinnitus management II : Treatment. In: American Journal of Audiology. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 49-70.
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