Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin

Marc Oliver Wright, Mary Jo Knobloch, Carrie A. Pecher, George Mejicano, Matthew C. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are becoming increasingly common in medical practice. Objective: To assess utilization, level of interest, and potential barriers to implementation of CDSS among physicians providing inpatient care in Wisconsin. Design and Participants: A Web-based survey consisting of 20 questions e-mailed to 5783 members of the Wisconsin Medical Society. Results: Of those contacted, 496 (9%) responded and 356 (72%) were eligible for the survey. According to 38% of respondents, CDSS were in place in their facility; less than a third were computer-based. Few existing users of CDSS reported being dissatisfied (2%) although 38% of the respondents were unfamiliar with CDSS or their use in medical practice. Most (79%) described themselves as receptive to new decision support tools, though the most commonly anticipated barrier to implementation was physician acceptance. Conclusions: CDSS are used in limited capacity in Wisconsin and existing systems are not likely to be computer-based. Despite physicians expressing a generally favorable interest in CDSS, a knowledge gap persists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-129
Number of pages4
JournalWisconsin Medical Journal
Volume106
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Clinical Decision Support Systems
Physicians
Medical Societies
Inpatients
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wright, M. O., Knobloch, M. J., Pecher, C. A., Mejicano, G., & Hall, M. C. (2007). Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin. Wisconsin Medical Journal, 106(3), 126-129.

Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin. / Wright, Marc Oliver; Knobloch, Mary Jo; Pecher, Carrie A.; Mejicano, George; Hall, Matthew C.

In: Wisconsin Medical Journal, Vol. 106, No. 3, 2007, p. 126-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wright, MO, Knobloch, MJ, Pecher, CA, Mejicano, G & Hall, MC 2007, 'Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin', Wisconsin Medical Journal, vol. 106, no. 3, pp. 126-129.
Wright MO, Knobloch MJ, Pecher CA, Mejicano G, Hall MC. Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin. Wisconsin Medical Journal. 2007;106(3):126-129.
Wright, Marc Oliver ; Knobloch, Mary Jo ; Pecher, Carrie A. ; Mejicano, George ; Hall, Matthew C. / Clinical decision support systems use in Wisconsin. In: Wisconsin Medical Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 106, No. 3. pp. 126-129.
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