Climatic factors are associated with childhood eczema prevalence in the United States

Jonathan I. Silverberg, Jon Hanifin, Eric Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD, also known as atopic eczema) is driven by a complex relationship between genetic predisposition and environmental exposures. We sought to determine the impact of specific climatic factors on the prevalence of AD in the United states. We used a merged analysis of the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) from a representative sample of 91,642 children aged 0-17 years and the 2006-2007 National Climate Data Center and Weather Service measurements of relative humidity (%), indoor heating degree days (HDD), clear-sky UV indices, ozone levels, and outdoor air temperature. As a proxy for AD, we used an affirmative response to the NSCH survey question asking whether the participant's child has been given a doctor diagnosis of "eczema or any other kind of skin allergy" in the previous 12 months. In multivariate models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, age, and household income, eczema prevalence was significantly lower with the highest-quartile mean annual relative humidity (logistic regression, adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=0.82 (0.71-0.96), P=0.01) and issued UV index (0.73 (0.64-0.84), P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1752-1759
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume133
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Eczema
Atopic Dermatitis
Humidity
Atmospheric humidity
Allergies
Ozone
Environmental Exposure
Weather
Proxy
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Surveys
Climate
Heating
Logistics
Skin
Hypersensitivity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Air
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Climatic factors are associated with childhood eczema prevalence in the United States. / Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Hanifin, Jon; Simpson, Eric.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 133, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 1752-1759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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