CLASSIFYING DISABILITY DATA: A FRESH, INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVE

Holly J. Fedeyko, Donald Lollar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to show the utility of the newly-approved World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework for organizing data from the National Health Interview Survey describing limitations in life activities among the U.S. population. Data were obtained from the 1994 to 1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Disability Supplement, Phase I (n=202,569). Forty-two items were selected from the survey to operationalize selected life domains of the ICF. Results indicated a prevalence rate of 19% for at least one life-domain limitation, with rates of limitations increasing with age, lower income and less education. Movement limitations were most frequently reported across the sample, but variations occurred within demographic characteristics. Life activities by sex and race produced noteworthy differences, by race/ethnicity generally, and by sex and race/ethnicity specifically. An example of mental health issues highlighted the use of the framework for health outcomes. The ICF provides a foundational conceptual and classification system for improving disability science. These data suggest that the ICF has utility by providing data consistent with other disability measures, while providing an expanded and integrated model for science and policy. Fresh information is gleaned from organizing the data by ICF's personal activity limitations. Differences by demographics across life domains, for example, can be more clearly presented and future analyses can assess associated impairments and environmental factors, including health service planning, health promotion, and access to care. The system can frame coherent integrated public health science and associated interventions to address the health and well being of people with disabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-72
Number of pages18
JournalResearch in Social Science and Disability
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

disability
health
Health Surveys
ethnicity
Demography
Interviews
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Health Planning
Health
health science
Disabled Persons
interview
science
Health Promotion
WHO
health promotion
Health Services
supplement
environmental factors
Mental Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

CLASSIFYING DISABILITY DATA : A FRESH, INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVE. / Fedeyko, Holly J.; Lollar, Donald.

In: Research in Social Science and Disability, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 55-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fedeyko, Holly J. ; Lollar, Donald. / CLASSIFYING DISABILITY DATA : A FRESH, INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVE. In: Research in Social Science and Disability. 2003 ; Vol. 3. pp. 55-72.
@article{af43705c24bc4da7a354deb20af63e04,
title = "CLASSIFYING DISABILITY DATA: A FRESH, INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVE",
abstract = "The objective of this study is to show the utility of the newly-approved World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework for organizing data from the National Health Interview Survey describing limitations in life activities among the U.S. population. Data were obtained from the 1994 to 1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Disability Supplement, Phase I (n=202,569). Forty-two items were selected from the survey to operationalize selected life domains of the ICF. Results indicated a prevalence rate of 19{\%} for at least one life-domain limitation, with rates of limitations increasing with age, lower income and less education. Movement limitations were most frequently reported across the sample, but variations occurred within demographic characteristics. Life activities by sex and race produced noteworthy differences, by race/ethnicity generally, and by sex and race/ethnicity specifically. An example of mental health issues highlighted the use of the framework for health outcomes. The ICF provides a foundational conceptual and classification system for improving disability science. These data suggest that the ICF has utility by providing data consistent with other disability measures, while providing an expanded and integrated model for science and policy. Fresh information is gleaned from organizing the data by ICF's personal activity limitations. Differences by demographics across life domains, for example, can be more clearly presented and future analyses can assess associated impairments and environmental factors, including health service planning, health promotion, and access to care. The system can frame coherent integrated public health science and associated interventions to address the health and well being of people with disabilities.",
author = "Fedeyko, {Holly J.} and Donald Lollar",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1016/S1479-3547(03)03004-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "55--72",
journal = "Research in Social Science and Disability",
issn = "1479-3547",
publisher = "JAI Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - CLASSIFYING DISABILITY DATA

T2 - A FRESH, INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVE

AU - Fedeyko, Holly J.

AU - Lollar, Donald

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - The objective of this study is to show the utility of the newly-approved World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework for organizing data from the National Health Interview Survey describing limitations in life activities among the U.S. population. Data were obtained from the 1994 to 1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Disability Supplement, Phase I (n=202,569). Forty-two items were selected from the survey to operationalize selected life domains of the ICF. Results indicated a prevalence rate of 19% for at least one life-domain limitation, with rates of limitations increasing with age, lower income and less education. Movement limitations were most frequently reported across the sample, but variations occurred within demographic characteristics. Life activities by sex and race produced noteworthy differences, by race/ethnicity generally, and by sex and race/ethnicity specifically. An example of mental health issues highlighted the use of the framework for health outcomes. The ICF provides a foundational conceptual and classification system for improving disability science. These data suggest that the ICF has utility by providing data consistent with other disability measures, while providing an expanded and integrated model for science and policy. Fresh information is gleaned from organizing the data by ICF's personal activity limitations. Differences by demographics across life domains, for example, can be more clearly presented and future analyses can assess associated impairments and environmental factors, including health service planning, health promotion, and access to care. The system can frame coherent integrated public health science and associated interventions to address the health and well being of people with disabilities.

AB - The objective of this study is to show the utility of the newly-approved World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework for organizing data from the National Health Interview Survey describing limitations in life activities among the U.S. population. Data were obtained from the 1994 to 1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Disability Supplement, Phase I (n=202,569). Forty-two items were selected from the survey to operationalize selected life domains of the ICF. Results indicated a prevalence rate of 19% for at least one life-domain limitation, with rates of limitations increasing with age, lower income and less education. Movement limitations were most frequently reported across the sample, but variations occurred within demographic characteristics. Life activities by sex and race produced noteworthy differences, by race/ethnicity generally, and by sex and race/ethnicity specifically. An example of mental health issues highlighted the use of the framework for health outcomes. The ICF provides a foundational conceptual and classification system for improving disability science. These data suggest that the ICF has utility by providing data consistent with other disability measures, while providing an expanded and integrated model for science and policy. Fresh information is gleaned from organizing the data by ICF's personal activity limitations. Differences by demographics across life domains, for example, can be more clearly presented and future analyses can assess associated impairments and environmental factors, including health service planning, health promotion, and access to care. The system can frame coherent integrated public health science and associated interventions to address the health and well being of people with disabilities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247458015&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247458015&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1479-3547(03)03004-5

DO - 10.1016/S1479-3547(03)03004-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34247458015

VL - 3

SP - 55

EP - 72

JO - Research in Social Science and Disability

JF - Research in Social Science and Disability

SN - 1479-3547

ER -