Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways

C. A. Hirshman, J. Peters, H. Downes, D. Leon, R. K. Lynn, J. Butler, Jon Hanifin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the mechanisms underlying the bronchoconstrictor response to 10% citric acid administered for 5 min in Basenji-Greyhound (BG) dogs, we evaluated the protection afforded by atropine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg iv) and by aerosols of isoproterenol (1 mg/ml) and cromolyn sodium (20 mg/ml). In untreated dogs, citric acid increased pulmonary resistance by 4.6- to 11.5-fold and decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) to 45-55% of the control response. Isoproterenol and cromolyn sodium significantly reduced the response, whereas atropine did not. Moreover we have demonstrated in the arterial plasma of these dogs a slow-reacting substance (SRS) after, but not before, citric acid challenge. This SRS exhibits both pharmacologic properties and chemical characteristics similar to leukotrienes. We conclude that mediators of immediate-type hypersensitivity rather than reflex mechanisms play a dominant role in the production of airway constriction during citric acid (5-min) challenge in BG dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1101-1107
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume54
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Constriction
Citric Acid
Autacoids
Dogs
Cromolyn Sodium
Atropine
Isoproterenol
Bronchoconstrictor Agents
Immediate Hypersensitivity
Leukotrienes
Aerosols
Compliance
Reflex
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways. / Hirshman, C. A.; Peters, J.; Downes, H.; Leon, D.; Lynn, R. K.; Butler, J.; Hanifin, Jon.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 1983, p. 1101-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirshman, CA, Peters, J, Downes, H, Leon, D, Lynn, RK, Butler, J & Hanifin, J 1983, 'Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways', Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 1101-1107.
Hirshman, C. A. ; Peters, J. ; Downes, H. ; Leon, D. ; Lynn, R. K. ; Butler, J. ; Hanifin, Jon. / Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways. In: Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology. 1983 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 1101-1107.
@article{b795422bdee946b29fe669e38ff2da3a,
title = "Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways",
abstract = "To understand the mechanisms underlying the bronchoconstrictor response to 10{\%} citric acid administered for 5 min in Basenji-Greyhound (BG) dogs, we evaluated the protection afforded by atropine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg iv) and by aerosols of isoproterenol (1 mg/ml) and cromolyn sodium (20 mg/ml). In untreated dogs, citric acid increased pulmonary resistance by 4.6- to 11.5-fold and decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) to 45-55{\%} of the control response. Isoproterenol and cromolyn sodium significantly reduced the response, whereas atropine did not. Moreover we have demonstrated in the arterial plasma of these dogs a slow-reacting substance (SRS) after, but not before, citric acid challenge. This SRS exhibits both pharmacologic properties and chemical characteristics similar to leukotrienes. We conclude that mediators of immediate-type hypersensitivity rather than reflex mechanisms play a dominant role in the production of airway constriction during citric acid (5-min) challenge in BG dogs.",
author = "Hirshman, {C. A.} and J. Peters and H. Downes and D. Leon and Lynn, {R. K.} and J. Butler and Jon Hanifin",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "1101--1107",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "8750-7587",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Citric acid airway constriction in dogs with hyperreactive airways

AU - Hirshman, C. A.

AU - Peters, J.

AU - Downes, H.

AU - Leon, D.

AU - Lynn, R. K.

AU - Butler, J.

AU - Hanifin, Jon

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - To understand the mechanisms underlying the bronchoconstrictor response to 10% citric acid administered for 5 min in Basenji-Greyhound (BG) dogs, we evaluated the protection afforded by atropine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg iv) and by aerosols of isoproterenol (1 mg/ml) and cromolyn sodium (20 mg/ml). In untreated dogs, citric acid increased pulmonary resistance by 4.6- to 11.5-fold and decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) to 45-55% of the control response. Isoproterenol and cromolyn sodium significantly reduced the response, whereas atropine did not. Moreover we have demonstrated in the arterial plasma of these dogs a slow-reacting substance (SRS) after, but not before, citric acid challenge. This SRS exhibits both pharmacologic properties and chemical characteristics similar to leukotrienes. We conclude that mediators of immediate-type hypersensitivity rather than reflex mechanisms play a dominant role in the production of airway constriction during citric acid (5-min) challenge in BG dogs.

AB - To understand the mechanisms underlying the bronchoconstrictor response to 10% citric acid administered for 5 min in Basenji-Greyhound (BG) dogs, we evaluated the protection afforded by atropine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg iv) and by aerosols of isoproterenol (1 mg/ml) and cromolyn sodium (20 mg/ml). In untreated dogs, citric acid increased pulmonary resistance by 4.6- to 11.5-fold and decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) to 45-55% of the control response. Isoproterenol and cromolyn sodium significantly reduced the response, whereas atropine did not. Moreover we have demonstrated in the arterial plasma of these dogs a slow-reacting substance (SRS) after, but not before, citric acid challenge. This SRS exhibits both pharmacologic properties and chemical characteristics similar to leukotrienes. We conclude that mediators of immediate-type hypersensitivity rather than reflex mechanisms play a dominant role in the production of airway constriction during citric acid (5-min) challenge in BG dogs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020575326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020575326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6406407

AN - SCOPUS:0020575326

VL - 54

SP - 1101

EP - 1107

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 8750-7587

IS - 4

ER -