Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions

Matthew Butler, Ilia Karatsoreos, Lance J. Kriegsfeld, Rae Silver

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prominent circadian rhythms of the endocrine system are important for our broader understanding of physiology and behavior, in both health and disease. There is now much evidence that disruptions in the circadian domain, due to either external factors such as shift work or internal factors such as sleep disturbances, can lead to physiological and psychological pathologies. There is interest and urgency in understanding how time is coordinated in the body. A master circadian clock resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. While this is the only tissue in which autonomous rhythms are self-sustaining, the molecular machinery is present in most peripheral cells. Rather than imposing time on the body then, the SCN entrains local clocks in a tissue-specific manner. These peripheral clocks then participate in controlling rhythmic transcription of genes associated with local tissue function. In this chapter, we examine the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks in the control of endocrine rhythms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems
PublisherElsevier
Pages345-369
Number of pages25
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9780128036082
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2016

Fingerprint

Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Circadian Clocks
Endocrine System
Circadian Rhythm
Hypothalamus
Sleep
Pathology
Psychology
Health
Brain
Genes

Keywords

  • Adrenal
  • Aging
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Clock genes
  • Estrogen
  • Glucocorticoid
  • Gonad
  • Jet lag
  • Melatonin
  • Prolactin
  • Seasonality
  • Shift work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Butler, M., Karatsoreos, I., Kriegsfeld, L. J., & Silver, R. (2016). Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions. In Mammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems (Vol. 1, pp. 345-369). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803592-4.00012-2

Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions. / Butler, Matthew; Karatsoreos, Ilia; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Silver, Rae.

Mammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems. Vol. 1 Elsevier, 2016. p. 345-369.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Butler, M, Karatsoreos, I, Kriegsfeld, LJ & Silver, R 2016, Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions. in Mammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems. vol. 1, Elsevier, pp. 345-369. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803592-4.00012-2
Butler M, Karatsoreos I, Kriegsfeld LJ, Silver R. Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions. In Mammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems. Vol. 1. Elsevier. 2016. p. 345-369 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803592-4.00012-2
Butler, Matthew ; Karatsoreos, Ilia ; Kriegsfeld, Lance J. ; Silver, Rae. / Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Functions. Mammalian Hormone-Behavior Systems. Vol. 1 Elsevier, 2016. pp. 345-369
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