Circadian myometrial and endocrine rhythms in the pregnant rhesus macaque: Effects of constant light and timed melatonin infusion

Toshihiko Matsumoto, David Hess, Kanchan M. Kaushal, Guillermo J. Valenzuela, Steven M. Yellon, Charles A. Ducsay

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    31 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Six chronically catheterized rhesus macaques maintained on a 12-hour-light/dark cycle (lights on from 7 am to 7 pm) showed a nocturnal uterine activity rhythm with peak contractile events between 9 and 11 pm (p <0.05). In blood samples collected at 3-hour intervals over a 24-hour period, we determined that plasma melatonin and progesterone concentrations were elevated at night whereas estradiol, estrone, and cortisol reached peak concentrations in the early morning (p <0.05). Lights were then left on for the remainder of the study. After 12 days in constant light, daily rhythms in uterine activity and plasma steriod levels were relatively unchanged, whereas melatonin concentrations were suppressed. Animals then received a timed infusion of melatonin (0.2 mg/kg/hr each day from 7 pm to 6 am daily until delivery). The nocturnal uterine activity rhythm and the rhythms in plasma steroid concentrations were maintained. We conclude that the 24-hour patterns in maternal uterine activity and plasma steroid hormone levels are circadian rhythms generate by an endogenous biologic clock and do not appear to be driven by the pattern of melatonin in circulation.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1777-1784
    Number of pages8
    JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Volume165
    Issue number6 PART 1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1991

    Fingerprint

    Melatonin
    Macaca mulatta
    Light
    Steroids
    Biological Clocks
    Estrone
    Photoperiod
    Circadian Rhythm
    Progesterone
    Hydrocortisone
    Estradiol
    Mothers
    Hormones

    Keywords

    • Circadian rhythm
    • melatonin
    • rhesus macaque
    • uterine activity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Cite this

    Circadian myometrial and endocrine rhythms in the pregnant rhesus macaque : Effects of constant light and timed melatonin infusion. / Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Hess, David; Kaushal, Kanchan M.; Valenzuela, Guillermo J.; Yellon, Steven M.; Ducsay, Charles A.

    In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 165, No. 6 PART 1, 1991, p. 1777-1784.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko ; Hess, David ; Kaushal, Kanchan M. ; Valenzuela, Guillermo J. ; Yellon, Steven M. ; Ducsay, Charles A. / Circadian myometrial and endocrine rhythms in the pregnant rhesus macaque : Effects of constant light and timed melatonin infusion. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1991 ; Vol. 165, No. 6 PART 1. pp. 1777-1784.
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