Ciclovia in a rural latino community

Results and lessons learned

Cynthia Perry, Linda K. Ko, Lidia Hernandez, Rosa Ortiz, Sandra Linde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Ciclovias involve the temporary closure of roads to motorized vehicles, allowing for use by bicyclists, walkers, and runners and for other physical activity. Ciclovias have been held in urban and suburban communities in the United States and Latin America. Objective: We evaluated the first ciclovia held in a rural, predominantly Latino community in Washington State. Setting: Three blocks within a downtown area in a rural community were closed for 5 hours on a Saturday in July 2015. Outcome Measures: The evaluation included observation counts and participant intercept surveys. Results: On average, 200 participants were present each hour. Fourteen percent of youth (younger than 18 years) were observed riding bikes. No adults were observed riding bikes. A total of 38 surveys were completed. Respondents reported spending on average 2 hours at the ciclovia. Seventy-nine percent reported that they would have been indoors at home involved in sedentary activities (such as watching TV, working on computer) if they had not been at the ciclovia. Conclusion: Regularly held ciclovias, which are free and open to anyone, could play an important role in creating safe, accessible, and affordable places for physical activity in rural areas. Broad community input is important for the success of a ciclovia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-363
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Rural Population
Hispanic Americans
Exercise
Walkers
Latin America
Observation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • ciclovia
  • Latino
  • open streets
  • physical activity
  • rural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ciclovia in a rural latino community : Results and lessons learned. / Perry, Cynthia; Ko, Linda K.; Hernandez, Lidia; Ortiz, Rosa; Linde, Sandra.

In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2017, p. 360-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perry, Cynthia ; Ko, Linda K. ; Hernandez, Lidia ; Ortiz, Rosa ; Linde, Sandra. / Ciclovia in a rural latino community : Results and lessons learned. In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 360-363.
@article{79d17f2f60d3483f8027209784780736,
title = "Ciclovia in a rural latino community: Results and lessons learned",
abstract = "Context: Ciclovias involve the temporary closure of roads to motorized vehicles, allowing for use by bicyclists, walkers, and runners and for other physical activity. Ciclovias have been held in urban and suburban communities in the United States and Latin America. Objective: We evaluated the first ciclovia held in a rural, predominantly Latino community in Washington State. Setting: Three blocks within a downtown area in a rural community were closed for 5 hours on a Saturday in July 2015. Outcome Measures: The evaluation included observation counts and participant intercept surveys. Results: On average, 200 participants were present each hour. Fourteen percent of youth (younger than 18 years) were observed riding bikes. No adults were observed riding bikes. A total of 38 surveys were completed. Respondents reported spending on average 2 hours at the ciclovia. Seventy-nine percent reported that they would have been indoors at home involved in sedentary activities (such as watching TV, working on computer) if they had not been at the ciclovia. Conclusion: Regularly held ciclovias, which are free and open to anyone, could play an important role in creating safe, accessible, and affordable places for physical activity in rural areas. Broad community input is important for the success of a ciclovia.",
keywords = "ciclovia, Latino, open streets, physical activity, rural",
author = "Cynthia Perry and Ko, {Linda K.} and Lidia Hernandez and Rosa Ortiz and Sandra Linde",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1097/PHH.0000000000000555",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "360--363",
journal = "Journal of Public Health Management and Practice",
issn = "1078-4659",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ciclovia in a rural latino community

T2 - Results and lessons learned

AU - Perry, Cynthia

AU - Ko, Linda K.

AU - Hernandez, Lidia

AU - Ortiz, Rosa

AU - Linde, Sandra

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Context: Ciclovias involve the temporary closure of roads to motorized vehicles, allowing for use by bicyclists, walkers, and runners and for other physical activity. Ciclovias have been held in urban and suburban communities in the United States and Latin America. Objective: We evaluated the first ciclovia held in a rural, predominantly Latino community in Washington State. Setting: Three blocks within a downtown area in a rural community were closed for 5 hours on a Saturday in July 2015. Outcome Measures: The evaluation included observation counts and participant intercept surveys. Results: On average, 200 participants were present each hour. Fourteen percent of youth (younger than 18 years) were observed riding bikes. No adults were observed riding bikes. A total of 38 surveys were completed. Respondents reported spending on average 2 hours at the ciclovia. Seventy-nine percent reported that they would have been indoors at home involved in sedentary activities (such as watching TV, working on computer) if they had not been at the ciclovia. Conclusion: Regularly held ciclovias, which are free and open to anyone, could play an important role in creating safe, accessible, and affordable places for physical activity in rural areas. Broad community input is important for the success of a ciclovia.

AB - Context: Ciclovias involve the temporary closure of roads to motorized vehicles, allowing for use by bicyclists, walkers, and runners and for other physical activity. Ciclovias have been held in urban and suburban communities in the United States and Latin America. Objective: We evaluated the first ciclovia held in a rural, predominantly Latino community in Washington State. Setting: Three blocks within a downtown area in a rural community were closed for 5 hours on a Saturday in July 2015. Outcome Measures: The evaluation included observation counts and participant intercept surveys. Results: On average, 200 participants were present each hour. Fourteen percent of youth (younger than 18 years) were observed riding bikes. No adults were observed riding bikes. A total of 38 surveys were completed. Respondents reported spending on average 2 hours at the ciclovia. Seventy-nine percent reported that they would have been indoors at home involved in sedentary activities (such as watching TV, working on computer) if they had not been at the ciclovia. Conclusion: Regularly held ciclovias, which are free and open to anyone, could play an important role in creating safe, accessible, and affordable places for physical activity in rural areas. Broad community input is important for the success of a ciclovia.

KW - ciclovia

KW - Latino

KW - open streets

KW - physical activity

KW - rural

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020739878&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020739878&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000555

DO - 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000555

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 360

EP - 363

JO - Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

JF - Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

SN - 1078-4659

IS - 4

ER -