Chronic methamphetamine exposure prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion increases infarct volume and worsens cognitive injury in Male mice

Damian G. Zuloaga, Jianming Wang, Sydney Weber, Gregory Mark, Stephanie J. Murphy, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Emerging evidence indicates that methamphetamine (MA) abuse can impact cardiovascular disease. In humans, MA abuse is associated with an increased risk of stroke as well as an earlier age at which the stroke occurs. However, little is known about how chronic daily MA exposure can impact ischemic outcome in either humans or animal models. In the present study, mice were injected with MA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline once daily for 10 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the final injection, mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for one hour followed by reperfusion. Mice were tested for novel object memory at 96 h post-reperfusion, just prior to removal of brains for quantification of infarct volume using 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium Chloride (TTC) staining. Mice treated with MA prior to tMCAO showed decreased object memory recognition and increased infarct volume compared to saline-treated mice. These findings indicate that chronic MA exposure can worsen both cognitive and morphological outcomes following cerebral ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMetabolic Brain Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 28 2016

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Wounds and Injuries
Reperfusion
Stroke
Data storage equipment
Brain Ischemia
Brain
Animals
Cardiovascular Diseases
Animal Models
Staining and Labeling
Injections

Keywords

  • cognition
  • memory
  • Methamphetamine
  • middle cerebral artery occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Chronic methamphetamine exposure prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion increases infarct volume and worsens cognitive injury in Male mice. / Zuloaga, Damian G.; Wang, Jianming; Weber, Sydney; Mark, Gregory; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Raber, Jacob.

In: Metabolic Brain Disease, 28.03.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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