Childhood hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and smoking in adolescence

Cédric Galéra, Eric Fombonne, Jean François Chastang, Manuel Bouvard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The objective of the study was to examine in both genders the link between childhood hyperactivity-inattention symptoms (HI-s) and smoking in adolescence, controlling for psychopathology, temperament and environmental risk factors. Methods: Subjects (421 males, 495 females), aged 7 to 18, were recruited in the GAZEL cohort representative of the general population and surveyed in 1991 and 1999. Parent and adolescent self-report measures were used to assess child psychopathology and smoking patterns. Logistic regression was used to assess the effects of childhood hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and other predictors on adolescent smoking. Results: In females, hyperactivity-inattention symptoms contributed independently to subsequent daily smoking (OR = 1.98, p = 0.04). In males, hyperactivity-inattention symptoms alone did not increase the risk for smoking. Conduct disorder symptoms was an important predictor in males (OR = 2.95, p <0.01) and females (OR = 1.75, p = 0.09). The risk of adolescent smoking was significantly increased in boys with high activity level (OR = 1.70, p = 0.03) and decreased in shy girls (OR = 0.60, p = 0.02). Parental smoking increased the liability to smoking in their offspring (males: OR = 1.96, p <0.01; females: OR = 1.63, p = 0.02). Conclusions: If replicated, these findings suggest a role for smoking prevention in girls with hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and in boys with high activity level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-108
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

adolescence
smoking
Smoking
childhood
Logistics
psychopathology
adolescent
Psychopathology
Conduct Disorder
Temperament
Self Report
liability
parents
Logistic Models
logistics
regression
gender
Population

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Children
  • Conduct disorder
  • Longitudinal
  • Smoking
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Childhood hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and smoking in adolescence. / Galéra, Cédric; Fombonne, Eric; Chastang, Jean François; Bouvard, Manuel.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 78, No. 1, 04.04.2005, p. 101-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galéra, Cédric ; Fombonne, Eric ; Chastang, Jean François ; Bouvard, Manuel. / Childhood hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and smoking in adolescence. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2005 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 101-108.
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