Child passenger safety

Dennis R. Durbin, Benjamin Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidencebased recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats as long as possible; (2) forward-facing car safety seats from the time they outgrow rear-facing seats for most children through at least 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats from the time they outgrow forward-facing seats for most children through at least 8 years of age; and (4) lap and shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated with some decrease in protection; therefore, parents should be encouraged to delay these transitions for as long as possible. These recommendations are presented in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate implementation of the recommendations by pediatricians to their patients and families and should cover most situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges all pediatricians to know and promote these recommendations as part of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health supervision visit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20182471
JournalPediatrics
Volume142
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Safety
Child Restraint Systems
Seat Belts
Motor Vehicles
Practice Guidelines
Cause of Death
Parents
Parturition
Pediatrics
Health
Pediatricians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Child passenger safety. / Durbin, Dennis R.; Hoffman, Benjamin.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 142, No. 5, e20182471, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durbin, Dennis R. ; Hoffman, Benjamin. / Child passenger safety. In: Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 142, No. 5.
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