Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Strenuous physical activity increases the risk of musculoskeletal injury and can induce muscle damage resulting in acute inflammation and decreased performance. The human body's natural response to injury results in inflammation-induced pain, swelling, and erythema. Among sports medicine physicians and athletic trainers, the mainstays of urgent treatment of soft tissue injury are rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). In order to reduce pain and inflammation, anti-inflammatory agents such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act on the multiple inflammatory pathways, which, although often very effective, can have undesirable side effects such as gastric ulceration and, infrequently, myocardial infarction and stroke. For centuries, natural anti-inflammatory compounds have been used to mediate the inflammatory process and often with fewer side effects. Tart cherries appear to possess similar effectiveness in treating the inflammatory reaction seen in both acute and chronic pain syndromes encountered among athletes and non-athletes with chronic inflammatory disease. This article reviews the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of tart cherries on prevention, treatment, and recovery of soft tissue injury and pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine and Sport Science
PublisherS. Karger AG
Pages86-93
Number of pages8
Volume59
ISBN (Print)9783805599931, 9783805599924
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2012

Fingerprint

Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Antioxidants
Pain
Soft Tissue Injuries
Inflammation
Sports medicine
Tissue
Nociceptive Pain
Sports Medicine
Wounds and Injuries
Ice
Acute Pain
Erythema
Human Body
Chronic Pain
Athletes
Sports
Swelling
Muscle
Stomach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Kuehl, K. (2012). Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief. In Medicine and Sport Science (Vol. 59, pp. 86-93). S. Karger AG. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341965

Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief. / Kuehl, Kerry.

Medicine and Sport Science. Vol. 59 S. Karger AG, 2012. p. 86-93.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kuehl, K 2012, Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief. in Medicine and Sport Science. vol. 59, S. Karger AG, pp. 86-93. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341965
Kuehl K. Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief. In Medicine and Sport Science. Vol. 59. S. Karger AG. 2012. p. 86-93 https://doi.org/10.1159/000341965
Kuehl, Kerry. / Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief. Medicine and Sport Science. Vol. 59 S. Karger AG, 2012. pp. 86-93
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