Chemotherapeutic dose intensification for treatment of malignant brain tumors: recent developments and future directions.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a large amount of research on malignant brain tumors over the past 70 years, the prognosis for most tumor types is poor. One current focus of research is increasing dose intensity of chemotherapeutic agents. Various ways to increase dose intensity include high-dose chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue (eg, bone marrow transplant), blood-brain barrier disruption or use of RMP7 to increase transvascular drug delivery, local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents (convection enhancement or clysis, antibody conjugates, and biodegradable polymers), chemoprotective agents, and tumor sensitizers. Improved identification of patients likely to respond to a given regimen may also increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We also discuss approaches to improve the design of nonrandomized trials by identifying and controlling potential confounding variables. This will improve the quality of individual studies and perhaps the comparability across studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-224
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2002

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Brain Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Convection
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Blood-Brain Barrier
Research
Neoplasms
Polymers
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow
Transplants
Antibodies
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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title = "Chemotherapeutic dose intensification for treatment of malignant brain tumors: recent developments and future directions.",
abstract = "Despite a large amount of research on malignant brain tumors over the past 70 years, the prognosis for most tumor types is poor. One current focus of research is increasing dose intensity of chemotherapeutic agents. Various ways to increase dose intensity include high-dose chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue (eg, bone marrow transplant), blood-brain barrier disruption or use of RMP7 to increase transvascular drug delivery, local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents (convection enhancement or clysis, antibody conjugates, and biodegradable polymers), chemoprotective agents, and tumor sensitizers. Improved identification of patients likely to respond to a given regimen may also increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We also discuss approaches to improve the design of nonrandomized trials by identifying and controlling potential confounding variables. This will improve the quality of individual studies and perhaps the comparability across studies.",
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