Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging

Steven Jacques, Daniel S. Gareau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The signal from a confocal measurement as the focal volume is scanned down into a tissue yields an exponential deeay versus depth (z_rbeus), signal = rho exp(-mu z_focus), where rho [dimcnsionless] is the local reflectivity and mu [I/cm] is an attenuation coefficient, A simple theory for how rho and mu depend on the optical properties of scattering (mu_s) and anisotropy (g) is presented. Experimental measurements on 5 tissue types from mice (white and gray matter of brain, skin, liver, muscle) as well as 0.1-μm-dia. polystyrene microspheres are presented. The tissues have similar mu_s values (about 500 [I/cm]) but variable g values (0.8-0.99). Anisotropy appears to be the primary mechanism of contrast for confocal measurements such as reflectance-mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCLSM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). While fluorescence imaging depends on fluorophores, and absorption imaging depends on chromophores, the results of this study suggest that contrast of confocal imaging of biological tissues depends primarily on anisotropy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6084
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
EventOptical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XVII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 23 2006Jan 25 2006

Other

OtherOptical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XVII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/23/061/25/06

Fingerprint

Optical properties
Tissue
Imaging techniques
optical properties
Anisotropy
anisotropy
laser microscopy
reflectance
Fluorophores
Optical tomography
attenuation coefficients
Chromophores
Laser modes
muscles
Microspheres
liver
Liver
chromophores
brain
mice

Keywords

  • Anisotropy
  • Confocal microscopy
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Optical imaging
  • Optical properties
  • Tissue optics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Jacques, S., & Gareau, D. S. (2006). Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 6084). [60840L] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.660050

Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging. / Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel S.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6084 2006. 60840L.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jacques, S & Gareau, DS 2006, Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 6084, 60840L, Optical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XVII, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/23/06. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.660050
Jacques S, Gareau DS. Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6084. 2006. 60840L https://doi.org/10.1117/12.660050
Jacques, Steven ; Gareau, Daniel S. / Characterizing tissue optical properties using confocal and low-coherence imaging. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6084 2006.
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