Characterization of Sodium‐Dependent [3H]GBR‐12935 Binding in Brain: A Radioligand for Selective Labelling of the Dopamine Transport Complex

Aaron Janowsky, Paul Berger, Frank Vocci, Rodrigo Labarca, Phil Skolnick, Steven M. Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

164 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: High‐affinity and saturable binding sites for the diphenyl‐substituted piperazine derivative [3H]GBR‐12935 have been characterized in crude synaptosomal membranes prepared from rat brain. The specific binding of [3H]GBR‐12935 is sodium‐dependent and is unevenly distributed among various brain regions, with the highest concentration of binding sites being found in the corpus striatum and nucleus accumbens. Sodium‐dependent [3H]GBR‐12935 binding in all other brain areas was 10% or less of the binding found in the striatum. The affinity of [3H]GBR‐12935 for binding sites in the striatum is increased in the presence of Na+ but other cations, including K+, Ca2+, or Mg2+, inhibit specific binding. There is an excellent correlation (r= 0.96, p < 0.01) between the potencies of a series of drugs in inhibiting [3H]GBR‐12935 binding to striatal membranes and their potencies in inhibiting [3H]3,4‐dihydroxyphenylethylamine ([3H]dopamine) uptake in synaptosomes. Agonists and antagonists of other neurotransmitter receptor or drug recognition sites have little or no effect on specific [3H]GBR‐12935 binding to striatal membranes. In addition, prior intracerebroventricular administration of 6‐hydroxydopamine results in a decrease in the number of specific [3H]GBR‐12935 binding sites in the striatum. These data indicate that [3H]GBR‐12935 is a selective radioligand of the presynaptic dopamine transport complex in brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1272-1276
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1986

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • 3,4‐Dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine) transport
  • Rat brain
  • [H]GBR‐12935

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this