Characterization challenges for nanomaterials

D. R. Baer, J. E. Amonette, M. H. Engelhard, D. J. Gaspar, A. S. Karakoti, S. Kuchibhatla, P. Nachimuthu, J. T. Nurmi, Y. Qiang, V. Sarathy, S. Seal, A. Sharma, Paul Tratnyek, C. M. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanostructured materials are increasingly subject to nearly every type of chemical and physical analysis possible. Due to their small sizes, there is a significant focus on tools with high spatial resolution. It is also natural to characterize nanomaterials using tools designed to analyze surfaces, because of their high surface area. Regardless of the approach, nanostructured materials present a variety of obstacles to adequate, useful, and needed analysis. Case studies of measurements on ceria and iron metal-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles are used to introduce some of the issues that frequently need to be addressed during analysis of nanostructured materials. We use a combination of tools for routine analysis including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) and apply several other methods as needed to obtain essential information. The examples provide an introduction to other issues and complications associated with the analysis of nanostructured materials including particle stability, probe effects, environmental effects, specimen handling, surface coating, contamination, and time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-537
Number of pages9
JournalSurface and Interface Analysis
Volume40
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Nanostructured materials
chemical analysis
contamination
x ray diffraction
spatial resolution
photoelectron spectroscopy
Cerium compounds
coatings
iron
nanoparticles
transmission electron microscopy
oxides
probes
high resolution
Oxides
Environmental impact
Contamination
metals
Iron
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Characterization
  • Nanomaterials
  • Surface analysis
  • TEM
  • XPS
  • XRD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Baer, D. R., Amonette, J. E., Engelhard, M. H., Gaspar, D. J., Karakoti, A. S., Kuchibhatla, S., ... Wang, C. M. (2008). Characterization challenges for nanomaterials. Surface and Interface Analysis, 40(3-4), 529-537. https://doi.org/10.1002/sia.2726

Characterization challenges for nanomaterials. / Baer, D. R.; Amonette, J. E.; Engelhard, M. H.; Gaspar, D. J.; Karakoti, A. S.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Nachimuthu, P.; Nurmi, J. T.; Qiang, Y.; Sarathy, V.; Seal, S.; Sharma, A.; Tratnyek, Paul; Wang, C. M.

In: Surface and Interface Analysis, Vol. 40, No. 3-4, 03.2008, p. 529-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baer, DR, Amonette, JE, Engelhard, MH, Gaspar, DJ, Karakoti, AS, Kuchibhatla, S, Nachimuthu, P, Nurmi, JT, Qiang, Y, Sarathy, V, Seal, S, Sharma, A, Tratnyek, P & Wang, CM 2008, 'Characterization challenges for nanomaterials', Surface and Interface Analysis, vol. 40, no. 3-4, pp. 529-537. https://doi.org/10.1002/sia.2726
Baer DR, Amonette JE, Engelhard MH, Gaspar DJ, Karakoti AS, Kuchibhatla S et al. Characterization challenges for nanomaterials. Surface and Interface Analysis. 2008 Mar;40(3-4):529-537. https://doi.org/10.1002/sia.2726
Baer, D. R. ; Amonette, J. E. ; Engelhard, M. H. ; Gaspar, D. J. ; Karakoti, A. S. ; Kuchibhatla, S. ; Nachimuthu, P. ; Nurmi, J. T. ; Qiang, Y. ; Sarathy, V. ; Seal, S. ; Sharma, A. ; Tratnyek, Paul ; Wang, C. M. / Characterization challenges for nanomaterials. In: Surface and Interface Analysis. 2008 ; Vol. 40, No. 3-4. pp. 529-537.
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