Characteristics of academic education programs for addictions practitioners

Eldon Edmundson, Traci Rieckmann, Phyllis Edmundson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A review of United States-based two-year (82), four-year (38), and graduate (68) addictions professional preparation programs indicated that the discipline lacks consistency regarding name, whether preparation has a science or arts academic foundation, whether preparation has an academic or technical base, and what department or academic unit hosts the program. Educators, researchers and providers working in the substance abuse field who participated in informal discussions of the results of this study found this variation understandable and believed the emerging nature of the discipline, institutional politics, the variation in terminology used by state and local agencies, and the interdisciplinary nature of the field create these inconsistencies. These variations indicate that the addictions profession has not yet developed consensus on what terminology best describes the discipline, nor the curricular framework that leads to most consistent academic preparation. Further, this variation provides insights about the influence the discipline has on public policy and the perceptions of addictions studies held by the public, consumers, and other related health professionals. Moving to full recognition as a profession will require attention to the preparation of professionals, standards for credentialing, and expectations for professional conduct and continuing professional development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-39
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Teaching in the Addictions
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Terminology
addiction
Credentialing
Education
Politics
Public Policy
Art
technical language
Substance-Related Disorders
Names
Consensus
education
profession
Research Personnel
Health
health professionals
substance abuse
public policy
graduate
educator

Keywords

  • Academic preparation for addiction counselors
  • Addiction counselor education
  • Addiction professional programs
  • Addiction studies
  • Addiction studies program names
  • Substance abuse counselor education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Characteristics of academic education programs for addictions practitioners. / Edmundson, Eldon; Rieckmann, Traci; Edmundson, Phyllis.

In: Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2004, p. 29-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edmundson, Eldon ; Rieckmann, Traci ; Edmundson, Phyllis. / Characteristics of academic education programs for addictions practitioners. In: Journal of Teaching in the Addictions. 2004 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 29-39.
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