Changes in the migratory properties of neural crest and early crest-derived cells in vivo following treatment with a phorbol ester drug

Rosalie Sears, Gary Ciment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

In previous work, we found that the phorbol ester drug 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) reversed the developmental restriction of melanogenesis that normally occurs in neural crest-derived Schwann cell precursors around embryonic Day 5 of quail development. That is, TPA treatment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from 7-day quail embryos caused Schwann cell precursors to regain the ability to give rise to melanocytes. In this paper, we examine other long-term effects of TPA on the differentiative and migratory properties of neural crest and crest-derived DRG cells, using heterospecific grafting methods. We report that TPA treatment in culture increased the extent of cell migration following grafting into host embryos, including some ectopic migration into the central nervous system and other locations. TPA did not, however, seem to change the fate of these crest-derived cells, except that some DRG cells underwent pigmentation, as had been observed previously. Interestingly, graft cells associated with peripheral nerves were found to be exclusively unpigmented, whereas graft cells found in all other locations, including the central nervous system, were both pigmented and unpigmented. This suggests that peripheral nerves may act in a fashion antagonistic to the effects of TPA. These findings are consistent with the notion that TPA treatment causes early crest-derived cells to regain developmental properties lost with developmental age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-143
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume130
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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