Changes in Spontaneous Activity Assessed by Accelerometry Correlate with Extent of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Nonhuman Primate

Henryk Urbanski, Steven Kohama, G. Alexander West, Christine Glynn, Rebecca L. Williams-Karnesky, Eric Earl, Martha Neuringer, Lauren Renner, Alison Weiss, Mary Stenzel-Poore, Frances Bahjat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of accelerometry to monitor activity in human stroke patients has revealed strong correlations between objective activity measurements and subjective neurological findings. The goal of our study was to assess the applicability of accelerometry-based measurements in experimental animals undergoing surgically induced cerebral ischemia. Using a nonhuman primate cortical stroke model, we demonstrate for the first time that monitoring locomotor activity prior to and following cerebrovascular ischemic injury using an accelerometer is feasible in adult male rhesus macaques and that the measured activity outcomes significantly correlate with severity of brain injury. The use of accelerometry as an unobtrusive, objective preclinical efficacy determinant could complement standard practices involving subjective neurological scoring and magnetic resonance imaging in nonhuman primates. Similar activity monitoring devices to those employed in this study are currently in use in human clinical studies, underscoring the feasibility of this approach for assessing the clinical potential of novel treatments for cerebral ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-451
Number of pages10
JournalTranslational Stroke Research
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Accelerometry
Reperfusion Injury
Brain Ischemia
Primates
Stroke
Locomotion
Macaca mulatta
Human Activities
Brain Injuries
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Actigraphy
  • Ischemia
  • Nonhuman primate
  • Rhesus macaque
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Changes in Spontaneous Activity Assessed by Accelerometry Correlate with Extent of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Nonhuman Primate. / Urbanski, Henryk; Kohama, Steven; West, G. Alexander; Glynn, Christine; Williams-Karnesky, Rebecca L.; Earl, Eric; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Weiss, Alison; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Bahjat, Frances.

In: Translational Stroke Research, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2012, p. 442-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Urbanski, Henryk ; Kohama, Steven ; West, G. Alexander ; Glynn, Christine ; Williams-Karnesky, Rebecca L. ; Earl, Eric ; Neuringer, Martha ; Renner, Lauren ; Weiss, Alison ; Stenzel-Poore, Mary ; Bahjat, Frances. / Changes in Spontaneous Activity Assessed by Accelerometry Correlate with Extent of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Nonhuman Primate. In: Translational Stroke Research. 2012 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 442-451.
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