Changes in erythrocyte membrane trans and marine fatty acids between 1999 and 2006 in older americans

William Harris, James V. Pottala, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Martin G. Larson, Sander J. Robins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last several years, national programs to lower the content of industrially produced (IP) C18:1 and C18:2 trans fatty acids in foods have been implemented, but whether this has resulted in lower blood trans fatty acid levels is unknown. Likewise, an increased perception of the health benefits of fish oils rich in EPA and DHA may have resulted in an increase in consumption and blood levels of these fatty acids. To explore these issues, we analyzed the changes in RBC fatty acid composition between the 7th (1998-2001) and 8th (2005-2007) examination cycles in a random sample of the Framingham Offspring cohort. This was a retrospective cohort study of 291 participants fromwhom bloodwas drawn at both examinations and for whom complete covariate data were available. Overall, the proportion of trans fatty acids in RBC changed by -23% (95% CI: -26 to -21%). RBC EPA+DHA proportions increased by 41% (95% CI: 31 to 52%) in 38 individuals who were taking fish oil supplements at examination 8, but in 253 participants not taking fish oil, the proportion of RBC EPA+DHA did not change. In conclusion, in a random subsample of Framingham Offspring participants with serial observations over 6.7 y, the proportion of trans fatty acids in RBC decreased. Those of EPA+DHA increased in people taking fish oil supplements. These changes could potentially translate into a lower risk for cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1297-1303
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume142
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Trans Fatty Acids
Fish Oils
Military Personnel
Erythrocyte Membrane
Fatty Acids
Insurance Benefits
Cohort Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Retrospective Studies
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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Changes in erythrocyte membrane trans and marine fatty acids between 1999 and 2006 in older americans. / Harris, William; Pottala, James V.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Larson, Martin G.; Robins, Sander J.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 142, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 1297-1303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, William ; Pottala, James V. ; Vasan, Ramachandran S. ; Larson, Martin G. ; Robins, Sander J. / Changes in erythrocyte membrane trans and marine fatty acids between 1999 and 2006 in older americans. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 142, No. 7. pp. 1297-1303.
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