Challenging Convention in Empathy Research: Developing a Mouse Model and Initial Neural Analyses

Jules B. Panksepp, Garet Lahvis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

"That's not empathy" is a response that we often hear when describing our findings to other scientists. For some of our colleagues, it is far-fetched that individuals from the species Mus musculus domesticus could be engaged in something like "empathy." The house mouse, which in some cases has been captive and inbred by biologists for over a century, may serve as a useful "model" system to experiment on the relatively low-hanging fruit of biomedical research, but the concept of empathy goes too far. Empathy, some argue, is a high-level psychological phenomenon reserved for species possessing a highly evolved prefrontal cortex, such as Homo sapiens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeuronal Correlates of Empathy
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Rodent to Human
PublisherElsevier
Pages161-176
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780128093481
ISBN (Print)9780128053973
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2018

Keywords

  • Contagion
  • Discomfort
  • Empathy
  • Mouse model
  • Neural correlates
  • Social development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Panksepp, J. B., & Lahvis, G. (2018). Challenging Convention in Empathy Research: Developing a Mouse Model and Initial Neural Analyses. In Neuronal Correlates of Empathy: From Rodent to Human (pp. 161-176). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805397-3.00013-9