Central influence on peripherally mediated habituation of an Aplysia gill withdrawal response

B. Peretz, Diane Howieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The parieto-visceral ganglion (PVG) modulates gill habituation, which in turn is mediated by a peripheral neural plexus. 1. A central influence accelerates the rate of habituation and depresses the responsiveness to waterdrops applied to a gill lobe (Figs, 2, 3). The branchial nerve is the major pathway for this influence (Figs. 4, 5). The ctenidio-genital nerve, on the other hand, elicits facilitatory effects in response to gill stimulation (Fig. 4). 2. Complete recovery, with and without the PVG connected to the gill, occurs in 3 hours, indicating that the gill plexus is responsible for the recovery (Fig. 4). 3. PVG influence increases with repeated stimulation, and it is suggested that the influence evokes inhibition in the gill neural plexus (Figs. 3C, 4). 4. Waterdrops evoked spike and PSP activity in L7; EPSP's decremented to repeated application of the stimulus (Fig. 6). L7 cannot be responsible for the observed central effects, however, because they were not suppressed when the cell was hyperpolarized. 5. The PVG is a more efficient analyzer of repeated stimulation to the gill than is the neural plexus. A model is presented for the interaction between the CNS and the gill neural plexus during habituation (Fig. 7).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1973
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aplysia
habituation
gills
plexus
Ganglia
nerve tissue
Ficus
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
figs
genitalia
effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Central influence on peripherally mediated habituation of an Aplysia gill withdrawal response. / Peretz, B.; Howieson, Diane.

In: Journal of Comparative Physiology, Vol. 84, No. 1, 03.1973, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{420c842a95e244c3a9e4060ce309da75,
title = "Central influence on peripherally mediated habituation of an Aplysia gill withdrawal response",
abstract = "The parieto-visceral ganglion (PVG) modulates gill habituation, which in turn is mediated by a peripheral neural plexus. 1. A central influence accelerates the rate of habituation and depresses the responsiveness to waterdrops applied to a gill lobe (Figs, 2, 3). The branchial nerve is the major pathway for this influence (Figs. 4, 5). The ctenidio-genital nerve, on the other hand, elicits facilitatory effects in response to gill stimulation (Fig. 4). 2. Complete recovery, with and without the PVG connected to the gill, occurs in 3 hours, indicating that the gill plexus is responsible for the recovery (Fig. 4). 3. PVG influence increases with repeated stimulation, and it is suggested that the influence evokes inhibition in the gill neural plexus (Figs. 3C, 4). 4. Waterdrops evoked spike and PSP activity in L7; EPSP's decremented to repeated application of the stimulus (Fig. 6). L7 cannot be responsible for the observed central effects, however, because they were not suppressed when the cell was hyperpolarized. 5. The PVG is a more efficient analyzer of repeated stimulation to the gill than is the neural plexus. A model is presented for the interaction between the CNS and the gill neural plexus during habituation (Fig. 7).",
author = "B. Peretz and Diane Howieson",
year = "1973",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1007/BF00694143",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "1--18",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology",
issn = "0340-7594",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Central influence on peripherally mediated habituation of an Aplysia gill withdrawal response

AU - Peretz, B.

AU - Howieson, Diane

PY - 1973/3

Y1 - 1973/3

N2 - The parieto-visceral ganglion (PVG) modulates gill habituation, which in turn is mediated by a peripheral neural plexus. 1. A central influence accelerates the rate of habituation and depresses the responsiveness to waterdrops applied to a gill lobe (Figs, 2, 3). The branchial nerve is the major pathway for this influence (Figs. 4, 5). The ctenidio-genital nerve, on the other hand, elicits facilitatory effects in response to gill stimulation (Fig. 4). 2. Complete recovery, with and without the PVG connected to the gill, occurs in 3 hours, indicating that the gill plexus is responsible for the recovery (Fig. 4). 3. PVG influence increases with repeated stimulation, and it is suggested that the influence evokes inhibition in the gill neural plexus (Figs. 3C, 4). 4. Waterdrops evoked spike and PSP activity in L7; EPSP's decremented to repeated application of the stimulus (Fig. 6). L7 cannot be responsible for the observed central effects, however, because they were not suppressed when the cell was hyperpolarized. 5. The PVG is a more efficient analyzer of repeated stimulation to the gill than is the neural plexus. A model is presented for the interaction between the CNS and the gill neural plexus during habituation (Fig. 7).

AB - The parieto-visceral ganglion (PVG) modulates gill habituation, which in turn is mediated by a peripheral neural plexus. 1. A central influence accelerates the rate of habituation and depresses the responsiveness to waterdrops applied to a gill lobe (Figs, 2, 3). The branchial nerve is the major pathway for this influence (Figs. 4, 5). The ctenidio-genital nerve, on the other hand, elicits facilitatory effects in response to gill stimulation (Fig. 4). 2. Complete recovery, with and without the PVG connected to the gill, occurs in 3 hours, indicating that the gill plexus is responsible for the recovery (Fig. 4). 3. PVG influence increases with repeated stimulation, and it is suggested that the influence evokes inhibition in the gill neural plexus (Figs. 3C, 4). 4. Waterdrops evoked spike and PSP activity in L7; EPSP's decremented to repeated application of the stimulus (Fig. 6). L7 cannot be responsible for the observed central effects, however, because they were not suppressed when the cell was hyperpolarized. 5. The PVG is a more efficient analyzer of repeated stimulation to the gill than is the neural plexus. A model is presented for the interaction between the CNS and the gill neural plexus during habituation (Fig. 7).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0015836469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0015836469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF00694143

DO - 10.1007/BF00694143

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 1

EP - 18

JO - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

JF - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

SN - 0340-7594

IS - 1

ER -