Cellular mechanisms of adaptive myelination

bridging the gap between animal studies and human cognition

Helena Bujalka, Ben Emery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Voelker and colleagues propose that we may illuminate learning-associated phenomena such as generalization by considering white matter plasticity. Consistent with this idea, human neuroimaging studies reveal learning-induced changes in adult white matter. Animal studies reveal that some forms of learning induce, and are dependent on, generation of new oligodendrocytes. Nevertheless, it remains unclear which alterations to myelin structure are most relevant to learning, and humans and rodents may profoundly differ in their capacity for oligodendrogenesis in adulthood. A full understanding of these issues will be critical to appreciating the role of adaptive myelination in human neuroplasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalCognitive Neuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 22 2016

Fingerprint

Cognition
Learning
Neuronal Plasticity
Oligodendroglia
Myelin Sheath
Neuroimaging
Rodentia
White Matter

Keywords

  • adaptive myelination
  • Neuroplasticity
  • oligodendrocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Cellular mechanisms of adaptive myelination : bridging the gap between animal studies and human cognition. / Bujalka, Helena; Emery, Ben.

In: Cognitive Neuroscience, 22.07.2016, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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