Cellular Learning Theory: Theoretical Comment on Cole and McNally (2007)

Kennon (Matt) Lattal, Rick E. Bernardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The idea that learning proceeds as a function of the discrepancy (or error) between expected and obtained outcomes is central to many theories of associative learning. However, remarkably little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this learning of predictive errors in fear conditioning, a widely used preparation in studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, S. Cole and G. P. McNally (2007) demonstrate an important dissociation between the establishment and regulation of predictive error at the cellular level. Their findings have added a level of complexity to currently established views of the function of NMDA and opioid receptors in learning and memory. This commentary discusses some of the implications of these findings for theoretical and neurobiological approaches to memory, as well as current thinking about the cellular circuitry involved in reward learning and drug abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1140-1143
Number of pages4
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume121
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

Learning
Opioid Receptors
Neurosciences
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Reward
Fear
Substance-Related Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Cellular Learning Theory : Theoretical Comment on Cole and McNally (2007). / Lattal, Kennon (Matt); Bernardi, Rick E.

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 121, No. 5, 10.2007, p. 1140-1143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{500cf79603c54fd68631ef5b38b39bc1,
title = "Cellular Learning Theory: Theoretical Comment on Cole and McNally (2007)",
abstract = "The idea that learning proceeds as a function of the discrepancy (or error) between expected and obtained outcomes is central to many theories of associative learning. However, remarkably little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this learning of predictive errors in fear conditioning, a widely used preparation in studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, S. Cole and G. P. McNally (2007) demonstrate an important dissociation between the establishment and regulation of predictive error at the cellular level. Their findings have added a level of complexity to currently established views of the function of NMDA and opioid receptors in learning and memory. This commentary discusses some of the implications of these findings for theoretical and neurobiological approaches to memory, as well as current thinking about the cellular circuitry involved in reward learning and drug abuse.",
author = "Lattal, {Kennon (Matt)} and Bernardi, {Rick E.}",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1037/0735-7044.121.5.1140",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "121",
pages = "1140--1143",
journal = "Behavioral Neuroscience",
issn = "0735-7044",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cellular Learning Theory

T2 - Theoretical Comment on Cole and McNally (2007)

AU - Lattal, Kennon (Matt)

AU - Bernardi, Rick E.

PY - 2007/10

Y1 - 2007/10

N2 - The idea that learning proceeds as a function of the discrepancy (or error) between expected and obtained outcomes is central to many theories of associative learning. However, remarkably little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this learning of predictive errors in fear conditioning, a widely used preparation in studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, S. Cole and G. P. McNally (2007) demonstrate an important dissociation between the establishment and regulation of predictive error at the cellular level. Their findings have added a level of complexity to currently established views of the function of NMDA and opioid receptors in learning and memory. This commentary discusses some of the implications of these findings for theoretical and neurobiological approaches to memory, as well as current thinking about the cellular circuitry involved in reward learning and drug abuse.

AB - The idea that learning proceeds as a function of the discrepancy (or error) between expected and obtained outcomes is central to many theories of associative learning. However, remarkably little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this learning of predictive errors in fear conditioning, a widely used preparation in studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, S. Cole and G. P. McNally (2007) demonstrate an important dissociation between the establishment and regulation of predictive error at the cellular level. Their findings have added a level of complexity to currently established views of the function of NMDA and opioid receptors in learning and memory. This commentary discusses some of the implications of these findings for theoretical and neurobiological approaches to memory, as well as current thinking about the cellular circuitry involved in reward learning and drug abuse.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35748985609&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35748985609&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0735-7044.121.5.1140

DO - 10.1037/0735-7044.121.5.1140

M3 - Article

C2 - 17907848

AN - SCOPUS:35748985609

VL - 121

SP - 1140

EP - 1143

JO - Behavioral Neuroscience

JF - Behavioral Neuroscience

SN - 0735-7044

IS - 5

ER -