Cellular FLIP can substitute for the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript gene to support a wild-type virus reactivation phenotype in mice

Ling Jin, Dale Carpenter, Megan Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Adam Vanarsdall, Nelson Osorio, Chinhui Hsiang, Clinton Jones, Steven L. Wechsler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Latency-associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have reduced reactivation phenotypes. Thus, LAT plays an essential role in the latency-reactivation cycle of HSV-1. We have shown that LAT has antiapoptosis activity and demonstrated that the chimeric virus, dLAT-cpIAP, resulting from replacing LAT with the baculovirus antiapoptosis gene cpIAP, has a wild-type HSV-1 reactivation phenotype in mice and rabbits. Thus, LAT can be replaced by an alternative antiapoptosis gene, confirming that LAT's antiapoptosis activity plays an important role in the mechanism by which LAT enhances the virus' reactivation phenotype. However, because cpIAP interferes with both of the major apoptosis pathways, these studies did not address whether LAT's proreactivation phenotype function was due to blocking the extrinsic (Fas-ligand-, caspase-8-, or caspase-10-dependent pathway) or the intrinsic (mitochondria-, caspase-9-dependent pathway) pathway, or whether both pathways must be blocked. Here we constructed an HSV-1 LAT(-) mutant that expresses cellular FLIP (cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein) under control of the LAT promoter and in place of LAT nucleotides 76 to 1667. Mice were ocularly infected with this mutant, designated dLAT-FLIP, and the reactivation phenotype was determined using the trigeminal ganglia explant model. dLAT-FLIP had a reactivation phenotype similar to wild-type virus and significantly higher than the LAT(-) mutant dLAT2903. Thus, the LAT function responsible for enhancing the reactivation phenotype could be replaced with an antiapoptosis gene that primarily blocks the extrinsic signaling apoptosis pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-400
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of NeuroVirology
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

CASP8 and FADD-Like Apoptosis Regulating Protein
Human Herpesvirus 1
Viruses
Phenotype
Genes
Caspase 10
Apoptosis
Trigeminal Ganglion
Fas Ligand Protein
Caspase 9
Caspase 8
Baculoviridae
herpes simplex virus-1 latency associated transcript
Mitochondria
Nucleotides
Rabbits

Keywords

  • Antiapoptosis
  • FLIP
  • Herpes simplex virus
  • LAT
  • Latency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Cellular FLIP can substitute for the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript gene to support a wild-type virus reactivation phenotype in mice. / Jin, Ling; Carpenter, Dale; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Vanarsdall, Adam; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L.

In: Journal of NeuroVirology, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2008, p. 389-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jin, Ling ; Carpenter, Dale ; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan ; Vanarsdall, Adam ; Osorio, Nelson ; Hsiang, Chinhui ; Jones, Clinton ; Wechsler, Steven L. / Cellular FLIP can substitute for the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript gene to support a wild-type virus reactivation phenotype in mice. In: Journal of NeuroVirology. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 389-400.
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