Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk

Paul Lewis, Ruth Nduati, Joan K. Kreiss, Grace C. John, Barbra A. Richardson, Dorothy Mbori-Ngacha, Jeckoniah Ndinya-Achola, Julie Overbaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast-feeding may be an important route of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vertical transmission in settings where it is routinely practiced. To define the prevalence and quantity of HIV-1 in cell-free breast milk, samples from HIV-1-seropositive women were analyzed by quantitative competitive reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (QC-RT-PCR). HIV-1 RNA was detected in 29 (39%) of 75 specimens tested. Of these 29 specimens, 16 (55%) had levels that were near the detection limit of the assay (240 copies/mL), while 6 (21%) had >900 copies/mL. The maximum concentration of HIV-1 RNA detected was 8100 copies/mL. The prevalence of cell-free HIV-1 was higher in mature milk (47%) than in colostrum (27%, P = 0.1). Because mature milk is consumed in large quantities, these data suggest that cell-free HIV-1 in breast milk may contribute to vertical transmission of HIV-1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-39
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume177
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998

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Human Milk
HIV-1
Milk
RNA
Colostrum
Breast Feeding
Reverse Transcription
Limit of Detection
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Lewis, P., Nduati, R., Kreiss, J. K., John, G. C., Richardson, B. A., Mbori-Ngacha, D., ... Overbaugh, J. (1998). Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 177(1), 34-39.

Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk. / Lewis, Paul; Nduati, Ruth; Kreiss, Joan K.; John, Grace C.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Overbaugh, Julie.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 177, No. 1, 1998, p. 34-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, P, Nduati, R, Kreiss, JK, John, GC, Richardson, BA, Mbori-Ngacha, D, Ndinya-Achola, J & Overbaugh, J 1998, 'Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 177, no. 1, pp. 34-39.
Lewis P, Nduati R, Kreiss JK, John GC, Richardson BA, Mbori-Ngacha D et al. Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1998;177(1):34-39.
Lewis, Paul ; Nduati, Ruth ; Kreiss, Joan K. ; John, Grace C. ; Richardson, Barbra A. ; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy ; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah ; Overbaugh, Julie. / Cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1998 ; Vol. 177, No. 1. pp. 34-39.
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