Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment.

Erin L. DeFries, Lisa C. McGuire, Elena Andresen, Babette A. Brumback, Lynda A. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Because of the growing number of caregivers and the awareness of related health and quality-of-life issues, caregiving has emerged as an important public health issue. We examined the characteristics and caregiving experiences of caregivers of people with and without cognitive impairment. METHODS: Participants (n = 668) were adults who responded to the 2005 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Caregivers were people who provided regular care to a family member or friend aged 60 years or older either with or without cognitive impairment (ie, memory loss, confusion, or Alzheimer's disease). RESULTS: Demographic characteristics of caregivers of people with cognitive impairment were similar to those of caregivers of people without cognitive impairment. However, compared with caregivers of people without cognitive impairment, caregivers of people with cognitive impairment reported higher levels of disability, were more likely to be paid, and provided care for a longer duration. Care recipients with cognitive impairment were more likely than care recipients without cognitive impairment to be older, have dementia or confusion, and need assistance with memory and learning. CONCLUSION: State-level caregiving surveillance is vital in assessing and responding to the needs of the growing number of caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Confusion
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Cognitive Dysfunction
Memory Disorders
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Public Health
Quality of Life
Demography
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

DeFries, E. L., McGuire, L. C., Andresen, E., Brumback, B. A., & Anderson, L. A. (2009). Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment. Preventing chronic disease, 6(2).

Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment. / DeFries, Erin L.; McGuire, Lisa C.; Andresen, Elena; Brumback, Babette A.; Anderson, Lynda A.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 6, No. 2, 04.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeFries, EL, McGuire, LC, Andresen, E, Brumback, BA & Anderson, LA 2009, 'Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment.', Preventing chronic disease, vol. 6, no. 2.
DeFries EL, McGuire LC, Andresen E, Brumback BA, Anderson LA. Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment. Preventing chronic disease. 2009 Apr;6(2).
DeFries, Erin L. ; McGuire, Lisa C. ; Andresen, Elena ; Brumback, Babette A. ; Anderson, Lynda A. / Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment. In: Preventing chronic disease. 2009 ; Vol. 6, No. 2.
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