Caregiver Well-being and Patient Outcomes in Heart Failure

A Meta-analysis

Julie T. Bidwell, Karen Lyons, Christopher Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Despite evidence from the broader caregiving literature about the interdependent nature of the caregiving dyad, few studies in heart failure (HF) have examined associations between caregiver and patient characteristics. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study is to quantitatively synthesize the relationships between caregiver well-being and patient outcomes. METHODS:: The MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched for studies of adult HF patients and informal caregivers that tested the relationship between caregiver well-being (perceived strain and psychological distress) and patient outcomes of interest. Summary effects across studies were estimated using random effects meta-analysis following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. RESULTS:: A total of 15 articles meeting inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. Taking into account differences across studies, higher caregiver strain was associated significantly with greater patient symptoms (Fisher z = 0.22, P < .001) and higher caregiver strain was associated significantly with lower patient quality of life (Fisher z = −0.36, P < .001). Relationships between caregiver psychological distress and both patient symptoms and quality of life were not significant. Although individual studies largely found significant relationships between worse caregiver well-being and higher patient clinical event-risk, these studies were not amenable to meta-analysis because of substantial variation in event-risk measures. CONCLUSIONS:: Clinical management and research approaches that acknowledge the interdependent nature of the caregiving dyad hold great potential to benefit both patients and caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 10 2016

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Meta-Analysis
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Psychology
MEDLINE
Databases
Guidelines
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Caregiver Well-being and Patient Outcomes in Heart Failure : A Meta-analysis. / Bidwell, Julie T.; Lyons, Karen; Lee, Christopher.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 10.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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